Vegalta Sendai loses Isaac Cuenca for the next six months

first_imgAfter dialing six goals and give one assist in his debut in the J-League (Japanese First Division) with Sagan Tosu, in whose salvation he ended up playing a fundamental role, Isaac Cuenca accepted Sendai’s offer with the aim of “being up and being able to play Asian competition”, as revealed to AS in an interview published last January.The Catalan, whom Japan had allowed him to relaunch his career, also revealed the interest of Vissel Kobe by Andrés Iniesta, a club with which he could not negotiate due to the Cup final. “Sendai pushed hard and decided to accept,” Isaac revealed Basin. The Spanish will leave the pitch only temporarily. It is estimated that he will return after summer and be available to play the final stretch of the season in Japan. The season in Japan has not yet started and Vegalta Sendai has already been forced to deal with bad news. And is that Isaac Cuenca, the Spanish player in which the club had deposited much of their hopes this course, will be low during the next six months due to an injury to the meniscus of the right knee. Before the Spaniard, Ryutaro Iio (back), Shun Nagasawa and Alexandre Guedes (ankle) were injured.Isaac Cuenca returned to Spain on February 5 and underwent surgery days later. Although the FC Barcelona squad has already started the recovery process, it was not until Wednesday when Vegalta Sendai announced that You will not be able to count on your big star until the end of next August. An absence that will further diminish the team led by Takashi Kiyama, who saw in Cuenca a fundamental piece in attack.last_img read more

Drug Could Protect Against Radiation Exposure

first_imgIt may not work against Godzilla, but a new drug could protect people from deadly doses of radiation. The compound, already in clinical trials to treat a blood disorder, may also make radiation therapy for cancer safer.“What’s really exciting about this work is that not only have they found this countermeasure to mitigate radiation-induced [damage], but the fact that it works in a time window of 24 hours after exposure,” says radiation oncologist David Kirsch of Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina.Radiation first strikes the bone marrow, wiping out the production of blood cells important for fighting infections, clotting, and carrying oxygen throughout the body. At high levels, radiation fries the gastrointestinal tract, damaging outer layers of the intestines and colon, and causing fluid loss, diarrhea, vomiting, and local infections, which can become more systemic and lead to death. The condition is known as radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS), and there are currently no approved drugs to treat it.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Researchers had suspected that two proteins known as hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2 (HIF-1 and HIF-2) play a role in maintaining the integrity of the intestines during various times of stress. To test whether they were linked to RIGS, radiation oncologist Amato Giaccia of the Stanford University School of Medicine in California engineered mice to lack a family of proteins called PHDs that normally destabilize HIF-1 and HIF-2. Without the PHDs, mice have higher-than-usual levels of the HIF proteins. Whereas normal mice all died within 10 days of exposure to a high dose of radiation aimed at the abdomen, 70% of mice lacking PHDs were still alive after 30 days. “We were very surprised by the magnitude of the response,” Giaccia says.Next, his team tried to replicate the results with a drug. They turned to dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), a compound known to block the PHD proteins and already in clinical trials to treat chronic anemia. Like mice lacking the PHDs, animals that received a dose of DMOG—even 24 hours after radiation exposure—survived longer than usual. Two-thirds of them were still alive 60 days after the exposure, the team reports today in Science Translational Medicine. DMOG didn’t alter the initial damage done to the gastrointestinal tract by radiation, but it helped the gut recover. Boosted levels of one HIF protein in particular, HIF-2α, the researchers showed, were key to the recovery.“What we’re accomplishing with DMOG is that we’re modifying the physiology of the normal tissue to give it time to repair and regenerate,” Giaccia explains.The new findings, Kirsch says, point toward an intervention that could be given in the 24 hours following a radiation emergency—such as the meltdown of nuclear reactors in Fukushima, Japan, in 2011—to save lives.Giaccia would also like to find out if the findings can benefit cancer patients. A drug like DMOG, he says, might ease the toxicity that accompanies radiation therapy. Patients taking it might also tolerate higher doses of radiation, applied more broadly throughout the body, killing more cancer cells than current methods.But Kirsch warns that it’s too soon to say whether DMOG, or other PHD-blocking drugs, can be used in cancer patients. “There’s some literature suggesting that targeting the HIF pathway could actually protect tumors from radiation,” he says, which would be counterproductive. “More studies need to be done to show that these compounds don’t affect tumor response.”last_img read more