Cop charged for slapping, threatening son’s mother

first_imgA Policeman, who allegedly told his son’s mother, “I will kill you and send you where your father is in the burial ground, your mother will come home and bury you,” was on Thursday charged and appeared at the Providence Magistrates’ Courts.Enoch JacobsEnoch Jacobs, also called “Doggie”, of Middle Road, La Penitence, Georgetown, appeared before Magistrate Judy Latchman and denied the three charges when they were read to him.The first two charges alleged that on September 19, 2019 at Hutsonville, East Bank Demerara, he used threatening and abusive language towards Annastatia Lewis.It was further alleged that on the same day at the same location, he assaulted Annastatia Lewis.According to the prosecution’s case, the Virtual Complainant (VC) was at home with her son, when Jacobs called and indicated he was coming to take the child for a haircut.The prosecution is contending that upon arriving, Jacob told the VC that he wanted her to accompany him; however, the woman refused. It was then, the prosecution’s case stated that Jacobs, realising the gates of the victim’s premises were locked, began to hurl explicit language towards her.The man allegedly became annoyed and jumped the woman’s gate and ran up the stairs. The court heard that the VC ran to safety and locked the doors, when the defendant allegedly proceeded to tell the woman that “I will kill you and send you where your father is in the burial ground, your mother will come home and bury you”.The woman’s cousin, who was at home, called the Police. The Police patrol arrived and the ranks instructed the man to leave the premises; however, as the victim was exiting the yard to enter the patrol vehicle, the man allegedly dealt her a slap.The man was subsequently arrested.The Magistrate, after listening to the facts, placed the father of four on $100,000 bail. The case will continue on October 15.The cop was previously charged in May for assaulting and threatening his wife at the Carnival Day parade on Vlissengen Road, Kitty, Georgetown.last_img read more

Ex-Giant Hunter Strickland finds a new home, could close again

first_imgNearly two months after his Giants career came to a close, Hunter Strickland may have found a job as a closer again.Strickland, who was non-tendered after a disappointing, self-destructive season in San Francisco, on Thursday signed a one-year contract with the Seattle Mariners.The hard-throwing right-hander lost his closer job last year with the Giants, but he immediately becomes one of the favorites to replace Edwin Diaz, the All-Star closer Seattle traded to the New York Mets. Strickland’s …last_img read more

Restore wetlands and preserve agricultural land with NRCS funding

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Natural ResourcesConservation Service (NRCS) has $3.9 million available to help Ohio landowners restore wetlands and $4 million available for easements to protect agricultural land from conversion to non-agricultural uses. The funding is part of a $350 million national effort by USDA to protect and restore key farmlands, grasslands, and wetlands through NRCS’ Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP).Last year, Ohio landowners restored 1,033 acres of wetlands through ACEP. Landowners received between $1,375 and $6,600 per acre in exchange for permanent easements to protect wetlands, depending on the location of the wetland. They can also choose a 30-year easement option at a reduced rate.Wetlands are areas saturated by water all or most of the year. Often called “nature’s kidneys,” wetlands naturally filter contaminants out of water. Wetlands also recharge groundwater; reduce flooding and soil erosion; support diverse populations of wildlife, plants, and fish; improve aesthetics; and offer recreational opportunities. Since 2005, NRCS assisted Ohio landowners in restoring more than 25,000 acres of wetlands.Agriculture land easements are designed to protect active working farms through an agreement with NRCS and a cooperating entity, such as your local Soil and Water Conservation District or Land Trust. Landowners work directly with the entity to secure easements, forever preventing development and subdivision while preserving agriculture use for future generations.ACEP applications are accepted year around, but you must apply by Wednesday, February 1, 2017, to be eligible for the current allotment of funding. Interested landowners should schedule an appointment with the NRCS office in their county’s USDA Service Center.To learn about ACEP and other technical and financial assistance available through NRCS conservation programs, visit Get Started with NRCS or your local USDA Service Center.last_img read more

Vote for the August Geocacher of the Month

first_imgIf you know an outstanding geocacher who should be considered for the honor, simply fill out this webform.Share with your Friends:More Team Geo-Rangers making the find.Team Geo-RangersGeocacher Newo Max had this to say, “Team Geo Rangers (Brett) as been caching since 2003, and recently reached his 30,000 find milestone. He’s hidden over 750 caches as well, including his SANTA BARBARIAN series profiling other local geocachers. He writes his motto “It’s all good!” in every cache he logs.“TGR” as he is widely-known both creates and attends event caches, and is always willing to help out new cachers with helpful advice and encouragement. We thanked him personally, and feel he says it best in his reply “Your welcome! Just trying to add value with the logs as a way to thank you for the extra effort. Every fun cache placed has a chance to attract and retain new geocachers. Keep up the great work!””Leave a comment to vote for the geocacher who you think should be Geocacher of the Month. Trekkie79Geocacher tweetnes says, “Trekkie79 is great geocacher with over 10,000 caches & put out 130 awesome caches. He is always there to help you out. You can call him anytime. He has done classes for 101 in geocaching & how to use the site.The world needs to know if all cachers were like him what a great world this would be.Plus he has a remarkable wife that backs him up & helps us all.” SharePrint RelatedThree Cheers for January’s Geocacher of the Month NomineesFebruary 13, 2015In “Community”May the Geocacher of the Month Be With You: Comment NowJune 14, 2014In “Community”North American Edition of Geocacher of the Month: Comment NowMay 19, 2014In “Community” Experience, friendliness and geocaching smarts—these could be used to describe all three nominees for the August 2014 Geocacher of the Month. Each has strong ties to their local communities, plenty of finds and hides, as well as a willingness to help out any geocacher who needs it. While all three are amazing, only one can be the Geocacher of the Month. Leave your comment below!Each of the nominees below is an essential part of the global geocaching community and will receive a prize package from Geocaching HQ in Seattle, but only one will be the next Geocacher of the Month. A  panel from Geocaching HQ will use your comments, community input and other data to decide the winner.Now it’s your turn to help us select the next Geocacher of the Month: write a supportive comment for the nominated geocacher you feel should be awarded the title.Geocacher ikolorikolorOne of the nominations for ikolor comes from Tracymegan who says, “When I first started caching and ever since then, I have always seen Ikolor as really a backbone of South Florida Caching. He wealth of knowledge, puzzle abilities, amazing finding skills, and determination to always fine a cache are unparalleled. She is the first to help out newbie cachers and is out and about with any number of cachers. You never know where you are going to find her. Her enthusiasm for this game and patience with all of us is so greatly appreciated! Her logs are fun and entertaining and her imagination is boundless.”Trekkie79 just zipping along.last_img read more

Ramping Up to GreenTown’s Eco-Homes Contest

first_imgAs Greensburg, Kansas, continues its recovery from the tornado that destroyed it two years ago, local nonprofit GreenTown forges ahead with plans for its showcase of green homesEven though it has faced two crushing adversaries – the vicious tornado that flattened it two years ago, and the lousy economy – Greensburg, Kansas, continues to rebuild. It also continues to attract attention, not only because of the scale of the task but because the town has committed to go green in commercial reconstruction that uses public money and in much of its residential rebuilding.One of the more remarkable examples in the residential area is a project led by Mennonite Housing Rehabilitation Services that yielded 20 homes offering 940 to 1,050 sq. ft., two-car garages, full basements (each with a safe room), efficient appliances, and well insulated walls and attics. The homes were offered to low-income buyers only, with adjusted gross-income limits, which began at $27,900, scaled according to the size of the prospective owner’s family.The green labThe town also is the setting for the GreenTown Chain of Eco-Homes, a 12-home project intended as a showcase for a variety of green construction strategies at different price levels. Last month, the first of the dozen homes planned for the project, the concrete Eco-Home Silo, opened to the public.The second home in the Eco-Homes lineup will be the University of Colorado’s entry in the 2005 Solar Decathlon, which took first place in the competition.For three succeeding Eco-Homes projects, GreenTown, in collaboration with open-source design firm FreeGreen, has been soliciting designs for their Chain of Eco-Homes Competition. Ideally, the contest summary says, the winning entries will be “seemingly ordinary homes that act in extraordinarily green ways.” All three winning designs will receive the right to be constructed in Greensburg as part of the Eco-Homes “Living Laboratory” project.GreenTown and FreeGreen suggest that contest entries, which must be submitted electronically by August 15, include block wall construction for a single-family house that includes 2 to 3 bedrooms and 1 to 2 bathrooms. The lot size is 75 x 140 ft.Another important consideration: construction costs must not exceed $154,000 for each home.The top prize includes $10,000; runners up will receive $1,000 each. All three winners will be represented on the FreeGreen website.last_img read more

Carbon Crossroads: Can Germany Revive Its Stalled Energy Transition?

first_imgThis post originally appeared at Yale Environment 360. Northern Germany, from the Polish borderlands in the east to the Netherlands in the west, is the stronghold of Germany’s muscular onshore wind power industry. This is where the lion’s share of the country’s nearly 30,000 wind turbines are sited, a combined force equal to the power generation of about 10 nuclear reactors. Where Germany’s northernmost tip abuts Denmark, soaring turbines crowd the horizon as far as the eye can see. And many more are coming as Germany strives to go carbon neutral by 2050. Yet despite their impressive might, the north’s wind parks are a reminder not only of how much has been accomplished in Germany’s Energiewende, or clean energy transition, but also of what remains to be done. The country has made a Herculean effort to shift to a clean energy economy. In just the past five years, government support and costs to consumers have totaled an estimated 160 billion euros ($181 billion). But Germany’s greenhouse gas emissions have not declined as rapidly as expected in response to the vigorous expansion of renewable energy, which now generates 40% of the country’s electricity. Germany’s politicians are even resigned to falling significantly short of the country’s 2020 goal of reducing emissions by 40% below 1990 levels.RELATED ARTICLESGermany’s Energy RevolutionGermany’s Plus-Energy TownOur All-Renewable Energy FutureDebating Our All-Renewable Energy FutureCost of Renewable Energy Continues to Fall Germany’s failings have come as a vexing shock to its environmentally conscious citizenry. While Germans still overwhelmingly back the energy transition — for years polls showed support in excess of 90% — about three-quarters say the government is not doing enough to slow global warming. Today, the Energiewende finds itself stalled and floundering. Germany’s carbon emissions have stagnated at roughly their 2009 level. The country remains Europe’s largest producer and burner of coal, which generates more than one-third of Germany’s power supply. Moreover, emissions in the transportation sector have shot up by 20% since 1995 and are rising with no end in sight, experts say. German consumers have seen their electricity bills soar since 2000, in part because of the renewable energy surcharge. Now, complex, discomfiting questions loom about the way forward if Germany is to meet even its minimal targets and play the nation’s part in putting the brakes on global warming. From green groups on the left, to independent think tanks, to industry associations, experts have put forth numerous plans to regain the momentum of the Energiewende and decarbonize Germany’s economy. The issue is urgent: The German Energy Agency (DENA), a think tank supported by public and private funds, found that if the country continues along its present course, carbon emissions will fall by only 62% by 2050 — well short of the government’s goal of slashing emissions up to 95% below 1990 levels by mid-century. And analysts say that the challenges Germany now faces will confront other industrialized societies as they attempt to wean themselves off fossil fuels. The effort began as a grassroots campaign The Energiewende began as a bottom-up movement that took off in 2000 when grassroots campaigns persuaded legislators to support renewable energy expansion through feed-in tariffs. In the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan in 2011, Chancellor Angela Merkel and her government got behind the energy transition and drafted blueprints to guide it. But in recent years, the government, in the face of auto industry opposition, backed off decarbonizing the transportation sector; has not supported a significant price on carbon; has dragged its feet on grid expansion; has declined to set a date for phasing out coal; and has not implemented significant parts of its own 2050 climate program. Some analysts say that Merkel’s decision to step down in 2021 could be a boon for the Energiewende, as the Green Party is rising in the polls and will likely play an important role in the next government. Against this backdrop, the German government’s Climate Protection Program 2050, the Energiewende’s current road map, has come under a barrage of criticism. “The goals set in the climate program aren’t nearly ambitious enough,” says Benno Hain of the Federal Environment Agency, referring to its vague aim of reducing emissions by 80% to 95% compared to 1990 levels. Germany must shoot for a 95% reduction and nothing less, Hain says, which means new big-picture scenarios and greater rigor in implementing them.   Tanja Gaudian, of the renewable energy utility EWS Schönau, argues that Germany is sorely in need of a new energy transition master plan. “It’s not even clear whether this Energiewende will continue to be one driven from below, by communities and citizens as it has so far, or whether the big utilities will be given a special role, even though they don’t deserve it,” she says, referring to their decades-long opposition to renewable energy. “There’s so much that’s up in the air.” Technological “miracles” won’t be necessary The government’s 2050 program, however, is not the only game plan in town for going climate-neutral. German industry, high-level research institutes, NGOs, and think tanks such as DENA have invested heavily in sophisticated analyses that sketch out alternative scenarios for decarbonizing Germany’s energy system. These scenarios address the nature of the technologies of the future; whether coal and other fossil fuels should be forced out of the energy supply or simply left to wither away through market forces; the role of synthetic fuels and hydrogen, as well as carbon capture and storage (CCS); and the extent and type of domestic renewable energy generation. All of these questions are complicated further by the ongoing phase-out of nuclear power, which is not contested in Germany.The major studies — even those conducted with involvement from Germany industry — concur that Germany can hit its 2030 targets if it changes course. At the very least, these pilot studies can inject new ideas into Germany’s energy policy debates. “These scenarios show that Germany’s climate and energy targets can be reached with current technologies and without breaking the bank,” says Toby Couture of the think tank E3 Analytics in Berlin. “We don’t have to pull rabbits out of hats or hope for technological miracles. There are two basic things needed to achieve these ambitious decarbonization goals: political will and investment certainty. In the early 2000s, Germany had both; now it arguably has neither.” Not surprisingly, green organizations and parties — including Greenpeace, Environmental Action Germany, Friends of the Earth Germany, and the German Greens and the Left Party — are calling for a more rapid expansion of renewable energies, a quicker legislated end to coal generation, and the full-scale revamping of Germany’s transportation sector. Greenpeace Germany has authored one of the most extensive models, which starts with the lofty premise that a 100% elimination of greenhouse gases (compared to 1990 levels) is possible in 30 years. Key to this scenario is that Germany can, and should, stop burning coal by 2030. Under this plan, the oldest and dirtiest coal-fired plants, one-third of Germany’s fleet, would have to shut down by 2020. Another third would close five years later, and the rest in 2030. Greenpeace calls for a steep carbon-pricing scheme that rises to 40 euros a ton by 2030. (The EU’s carbon-trading scheme currently lists a ton of carbon at 12 euros.) Wind and solar would bridge the gap The energy generation capacity lost by removing coal and nuclear power from the supply would be made up for primarily by renewables, argues Greenpeace — above all offshore wind, which is still in its early stages in Germany. While the massive rollout of offshore wind power — more than 12 times the current fleet of 1,170 turbines — is the central plank of Greenpeace’s strategy, it also calls for a tripling of onshore wind generation and five times the photovoltaic capacity. In the interim, Greenpeace acknowledges that renewables would probably have to be aided by natural gas-fired generation. These ambitious goals would be achievable, argues Greenpeace, by reducing demand: dramatic energy efficiency measures could slash demand for electricity by 18% and for heat by 46% compared to 2012 levels. Moreover, decarbonizing the transportation sector by 2030 implies not only accelerating the transition to electric vehicles, but phasing out conventional, gasoline-powered cars between 2025 and 2035, Greenpeace says. “It’s definitely feasible to ramp down coal by 2030,” says Jörg Mühlenhoff of the Agency for Renewable Energies, a Berlin-based renewables advocacy organization. Indeed, Mühlenhoff says that if a carbon price hits 30 euros, that would effectively spell the end of coal. He adds that renewables could cover most of the gap left by coal if the German government introduces new policy initiatives to spur investments in green energy. Until quite recently, most of Germany’s industrial sectors, particularly the more energy-intensive among them, had treated Energiewende with acute skepticism. They worried that high energy costs and supply bottlenecks would hurt their competitive edge in international export markets. Yet German industry is becoming more deeply involved in the Energiewende, given the demand for the likes of renewable energy infrastructure (think wind turbines, manufactured by Siemens), electric vehicles, and other green energy technologies. Industry now believes it’s better to jump on the bandwagon and engage in policy discussions rather than carp from the sidelines. Earlier this year, for example, a call for government action signed by 50 prominent businesses — including Siemens and the electronics and construction industries — insisted that “Germany needs a robust strategy for implementing its comparatively stringent emission reduction targets if it does not want to fall behind in the global race to develop carbon-neutral economies.” This turnaround is nowhere more evident than in the pilot study of the Federation of German Industries (BDI), Germany’s largest and most powerful industrial lobby organization. In close collaboration with German businesses, BDI has modeled several Energiewende scenarios that are unapologetically pro-business and pro-industry, yet support the broader goals of the energy transition. “The remarkable thing about the BDI study is that German industry is saying that the Energiewende is technically and economically feasible by 2050,” says Cyril Stephanos of Germany’s National Academy of Science and Engineering, which runs an Energy Systems of the Future program. “It shows that there’s money to be made and not just for industry but for the entire economy.” A need for an international consensus The BDI study, however, underscores that unless there’s a multilateral international consensus about targets, burden sharing, and tools like a global CO2 price, Germany should shoot for reducing emissions by only 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. The study claims that, when factoring in savings accrued by dropping fossil fuels from the supply, Germany could reach that target at an additional cost of 240 billion euros, while reducing emissions by a full 95% would cost the country 500 billion euros. This BDI scenario relies strongly on energy efficiency, especially in the housing and building sectors, where the chemical industry has much to gain from retrofitting older buildings and providing new buildings with state-of-the-art insulation. It calls for doubling the rate of retrofitting housing and urges requirements that all new homes essentially be highly energy-efficient “passive houses.” A third approach to fixing the Energiewende combines a rigorous reduction of emissions (95% by 2050) with solutions that appeal to German business. The research institute DENA favors a rollout of sun- and wind-based renewables, but also advocates for a broader mix of technologies that includes a high volume of synthetic fuels. Both the DENA and BDI scenarios also depend on carbon capture and storage (CCS) in the transition’s final phase, when energy intensive industries will have to be decarbonized. “We ran our modeling through several times,” explains Christoph Jugel, head of DENA’s energy systems analysis unit. “And even using other technologies we couldn’t manage to eliminate the last 16 million tons of CO2 left without CCS.” But Jugel notes that the different scenarios don’t factor in technological breakthroughs that can, and most probably will, happen in the decades ahead. Stephanos says the studies show that Germany will need anywhere from four to seven times as much wind and solar power as it has now. “All of the studies mention about 5 to 10 million electric cars by 2030,” notes Stephanos. “We’re ramping up, which is good, but we’re not yet close to even a million. There’s still a lot left to figure out. We don’t even know if electricity, hydrogen fuel cells, or biofuels are the best way to decarbonize transportation. It’s astonishing how much more Germany has to do.”   Paul Hockenos is a Berlin-based writer whose work has appeared in The Nation, Foreign Policy, The New York Times, and The Atlantic.last_img read more