DWTS’ Lindsay Arnold Reveals Her, Sam Cusick’s Daughter’s Name

first_imgMom’s chosen a moniker! Lindsay Arnold revealed her infant daughter’s name on Wednesday, November 4.The Dancing With the Stars pro, 26, announced that her newborn’s name is Sage Jill Cusick in an Instagram post featuring three photos of her daughter.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – “We could not be more in love with her and feel blessed beyond words to be her parents,” Arnold wrote. “She entered this world on the same day that we lost Sams beautiful mother just one year ago and we couldn’t help but see God’s hand in this and know that Sage was handed down to us by her beautiful angel grandmother, Jennifer Jill Gillette Cusick. Thank you all so much for the love and support you have sent our way.”Arnold gave birth to her and Sam Cusick’s baby girl on Monday, November 2, via C-section. “The most beautiful surprise on this very special day. Baby Girl and mama are healthy and well,” the Utah native wrote via Instagram at the time. “More details to come but wanted to share this first pic of our little family.”The So You Think You Can Dance alum received supportive comments from her DWTS costars, from pregnant Witney Carson to new dad Artem Chigvintsev. “My heart! She’s so perfect in every way! SO SO HAPPY FOR YOU TWO! I can’t wait to snuggle her!!!!!!!” the Emmy winner, 27, wrote, while the Russian dancer, 38, commented, “Omg congratulations. So so beautiful.”- Advertisement – Her initial symptoms were “very tough,” Arnold exclusively told Us Weekly two months later. “Right now, I’m at 21 weeks and I am feeling great. I feel like the first 12 weeks, people don’t joke, you don’t feel like yourself. There are so many things changing. I had a bit of nausea. I was always tired.”She and her high school sweetheart tied the knot in June 2015 in Utah and previously maintained a long-distance marriage while she filmed DWTS.Dancing With The Stars Lindsay Arnold Reveals Her and Sam Cusick Newborn Daughter NameLindsay Arnold and Sam Cusick Courtesy Lindsay Arnold/Instagram“He would fly out on the weekends, stay for the show, have to fly back right after the show to get back for work,” the dancer explained to Us in July. “That was pretty much the only time we got to see each other was on show days at my trailer.”Listen to Us Weekly’s Hot Hollywood as each week the editors of Us break down the hottest entertainment news stories! Arnold went on to post an Instagram Story photo of herself breast-feeding the newborn, writing, “Late nights with baby girl. I love her so much. 1:47 a.m.”The season 25 winner revealed her pregnancy news in May. “Ohhhhh baby,” Arnold wrote via Instagram at the time. “Mom and Dad love you already. #November2020.”- Advertisement –last_img read more

Pain expert: Medicinal cannabis for non-cancer pain based on ‘anecdote’

first_imgStuff co.nz 13 May 2017Family First Comment: Yep. Science over rhetoric. “The international data on which one could make an informed decision about the effect of medicinal cannabis on chronic non-cancer pain is in fact very poor. The conclusions have been oversold,”The late Helen Kelly swore medical cannabis was the only thing that kept her pain at bay after cancerous tumours broke her back.Kelly spent her final months battling for better access to medicinal cannabis products, before she died of lung cancer in October last year.Victory came posthumously in February, when it was announced that authority to approve applications from medical specialists for non-pharmaceutical grade medicinal cannabis was passed from Government ministers to the Ministry of Health.But international pain specialist Professor Milton Cohen, from Sydney, has urged specialists not to prescribe medicinal cannabis for chronic pain conditions – such as multiple sclerosis until there’s more substantial evidence.“The international data on which one could make an informed decision about the effect of medicinal cannabis on chronic non-cancer pain is in fact very poor. The conclusions have been oversold,” Cohen said.Cohen presented his view at the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists’ (ANZCA) Annual Scientific meeting in Brisbane on Saturday May 13, attended by more than 2000 medical practitioners. Cohen represented ANZCA’s Faculty of Pain Medicine.Cohen was concerned anecdote and “community enthusiasm” had preceded science when it came to prescribing medicinal cannabis for patients who suffered chronic non-cancer pain.It had created a culture of “false hope” about medicinal cannabis as a treatment, he said.“If doctors are to prescribe substances – that is if they are to be available on doctors’ prescriptions – they should be proven substances.“On the basis of what we know about cannabis as a treatment it’s not going to revolutionise the field of chronic pain management.”READ MORE: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/92550869/pain-expert-medicinal-cannabis-for-noncancer-pain-based-on-anecdoteFalse hope driving claims medicinal cannabis is magic pillScoop Health 13 May 2017‘’False hope’’ driving claims medicinal cannabis is ‘’magic pill’’ for chronic pain reliefPrescribing medicinal cannabis for patients with chronic non-cancer pain is not going to revolutionise their treatment and should not be supported until there is substantial proof of its effectiveness, according to a leading pain specialist.Professor Milton Cohen is presenting Medicinal cannabis for chronic non-cancer pain: promise or pothole? at the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) annual scientific meeting in Brisbane on Saturday May 13.“There is no reason to be enthusiastic about cannabinoids in the treatment of non-cancer related chronic pain,’’ Professor Cohen said.‘‘On the basis of what we know about cannabis as a treatment it’s not going to revolutionise the field of chronic pain management.’’Professor Cohen is a specialist pain medicine physician in Sydney and Director of Professional Affairs for ANZCA’s Faculty of Pain Medicine. The Faculty does not support the use of cannabinoids in chronic non-cancer pain ‘’until such time as a clear therapeutic role for them is identified in the scientific literature.’’Professor Cohen said he was concerned that ‘’anecdote and clamour’’ and ‘’community enthusiasm’’ had preceded science on the issue of prescribing medicinal cannabis for patients who suffered chronic non-cancer pain. As a result, a culture of ‘’false hope’’ based on the elusive idea of a ‘’magic pill’’ was driving community misinformation about medicinal cannabis as a treatment for such patients.The Federal government last year legalised a pathway for access of patients to Australian-grown and manufactured medicinal cannabis, subject to state and territory government regulations. In New Zealand, the use of cannabis-based products for medicinal purposes is available only on prescription authorised by the Ministry of Health.‘’It’s a classic example of the cart being put before the horse with a political imperative to facilitate access to an unproven medicine,’’ Professor Cohen said. International studies that have assessed the effectiveness of medicinal cannabis for non-cancer chronic pain have revealed very ‘’modest’’ effects, he said.‘’The international data on which one could make an informed decision about the effect of medicinal cannabis on chronic non-cancer pain is in fact very poor. The conclusions have been oversold,’’ he said.Professor Cohen said the management of chronic non-cancer pain is complex as it required consideration of a range of factors including the medical, physical, psychological and social.‘’We know that chronic pain is a much more complex phenomenon which requires a holistic approach to management that is tailored to the individual’s circumstances. To rely only on medicines is just not going to work.‘’If doctors are to prescribe substances—that is if they are to be available on doctors’ prescriptions—they should be proven substances,’’ Professor Cohen explained.Professor Cohen cited an ongoing study of 1500 people who had been prescribed opioids for chronic non-cancer pain, undertaken by the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre at the University of New South Wales. Almost half of those surveyed said they had used cannabis for recreational purposes, one in six admitted to using cannabis in search of pain relief and one quarter said they would use cannabis in search of pain relief if they could.‘’We know that cannabis is freely available but we also know that drugs are not the mainstay of managing chronic pain,’’ Professor Cohen said.Professor Cohen said that, given the legislative changes introduced by the Federal government and some states and territories, the introduction of individualised trials of medicinal cannabis for patients with chronic non-cancer pain to monitor and evaluate its effectiveness and adverse effects might be considered. This would require the development of a patient register, similar to an approach introduced in Israel, to ensure that the trial was properly monitored and managed.‘’Given the reality of the situation – these substances are going to be produced in Australia and will be marketed — so there now is an opportunity for individual, personalised clinical studies to ascertain if there is a benefit from this treatment,’’ Professor Cohen said.About FPMThe Faculty of Pain Medicine is a world-leading professional organisation for pain specialists that sets standards in pain medicine and is responsible for education and training in the discipline in Australia and New Zealand. Pain medicine is multidisciplinary, recognising that the management of severe pain requires the skills or more than one area of medicine.Chronic pain affects about one in five people in Australia and New Zealand. Specialists also manage acute pain (post-operative, post-trauma, acute episodes of pain in medical conditions) and cancer pain.http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/GE1705/S00087/false-hope-driving-claims-medicinal-cannabis-is-magic-pill.htmlast_img read more

The Latest: Seahawks give options to season ticket holders

first_imgThe Latest: Seahawks give options to season ticket holders ___The plan to have fans at the World Golf Championships event in Memphis has been scrapped.Officials announced Thursday that the FedEx St. Jude Invitational at TPC Southwind will not have any spectators due to what they call “an abundance of caution.” Tournament officials have been talking extensively with both the PGA Tour and local and state health officials. Executive director Darrell Smith says they had a safety plan for limited spectators but ultimately felt it was best to host without any fans. Ticket purchases will be refunded automatically.The PGA Tour and the Memorial announced Monday a reversal of their plan for a limited amount of spectators next week in Dublin, Ohio, because of the COVID-19 pandemic. This means that every PGA Tour event through at least July will be held without fans since play resumed June 11 in Texas. North Carolina State says five people tied to Wolfpack sports have tested positive for the new coronavirus.Athletics spokesman Fred Demarest said Thursday those positives came after the school tested 315 athletes, coaches and staff starting May 29. That’s a positive rate of roughly 1.6%.N.C. State athletic director Boo Corrigan had announced in early June that the school had begun a schedule of allowing athletes to return in phases to campus.That plan started with testing of members of the football, men’s basketball and women’s basketball programs who live locally. Athletes who were cleared were then allowed to participate in voluntary workouts in small groups.On Wednesday, rival North Carolina said it was pausing football workouts for at least a week. That came after 37 positive results among 429 tests administered to UNC athletes, coaches and staff as they returned to campus in phases starting in June. ___Brazil’s soccer confederation said Thursday its main national championship will be played between Aug.9 and Feb.21. The Brasileirāo tournament usually starts in May and ends in December but was delayed by the COVID-19 pandemic. The confederation also said it expected World Cup qualifiers to be played in the same dates decided by FIFA. The earliest fixtures are scheduled for September. More than 68,000 people have died from COVID-19 in Brazil, and another 1.7 million are confirmed to have the disease. ___The Atlantic Coast Conference is putting fall competitions on hold until at least Sept. 1 due to the coronavirus pandemic, a move that won’t affect football as of now.The league announced the decision Thursday impacting non-revenue sports such as soccer, volleyball, field hockey and cross country. North Carolina State and Louisville meet on Sept. 2 in the first football game involving any league teams.Schools won’t be able to hold exhibitions or regular-season competition before that date, and it will be up to the schools to determine whether to reschedule any affected events. But the ACC isn’t barring teams from holding workouts and preseason practices “in anticipation of a fall season.”___ In a letter to season ticket holders on Thursday, the team said choosing to pause a season ticket will release the seats for the 2020 season only, and the ticket holder will be able to purchase the same seat again in 2021.Fans who choose to keep their tickets for the 2020 upcoming season will have priority if there are schedule changes or changes in stadium capacity.The Seahawks did not say how many fans would be allowed inside CenturyLink Field. Earlier this week, the Baltimore Ravens said they’ll seat fewer than 14,000 fans at M&T Bank Stadium.___Dartmouth is eliminating five varsity sports teams and several staff positions. July 9, 2020 Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:___The Seattle Seahawks are allowing season ticket holders the option to pause their season tickets and receive a refund for the upcoming NFL season or keep a credit in their account for the 2021 season. Planning for a season they acknowledge will be “very different,” the Cleveland Browns told their season-ticket holders they can opt out of the 2020 season without penalty and other plans related to the COVID-19 virus and its impact on the NFL.The Browns sent a letter to their fans on Thursday that outlined some new policies due to the pandemic. Anyone attending a game at FirstEnergy Stadium will have to follow physical-distancing guidelines and wear “mandated facial coverings.”The team did not say how many fans will be allowed in the 67,000-seat stadium, which has been the Browns’ lakefront home since 1999.Earlier this week, the Baltimore Ravens said they’ll seat fewer than 14,000 fans at M&T Bank Stadium. The Browns are scheduled to open the season there on Sept. 13. If Cleveland season-ticket holders decide not to attend games in 2020, they can retain their same seat location in 2021. Associated Press ___Real Madrid coach Zinedine Zidane says forward Vinícius Júnior will need to have another coronavirus test after an initial test result came out “wrong.”Zidane says “the doctor informed me that the test had come out wrong and we were going to repeat it.”Zidane says the Brazilian’s test was not positive. He says “sometimes there are errors. It wasn’t negative or positive.”Spanish league players have undergone regular testing since the competition resumed last month. The Ivy League school announced Thursday that men’s and women’s swimming and diving, men’s and women’s golf, and men’s lightweight rowing, have been cut, effective immediately. That drops to 30 the number of varsity teams and will reduce the number of recruited athletes in incoming classes by 10%. A total of about 110 student-athletes are affected. Jobs for 15 staff, including eight coaching positions, also will end.The change in the number of teams does not alter the college’s compliance with federal Title IX regulations, which require equal opportunities for women and men in varsity athletics, Dartmouth President Philip J. Hanlon said in an email to faculty, students, staff, and undergraduate families.Dartmouth also is permanently closing its Hanover Country Club, which has deficits expected to swell to $1 million a year.The cuts are projected to save more than $2 million as the school addresses a projected $150 million deficit caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.___ Some players and staff members at Valencia and Alavés tested positive in March. They have all recovered. No player has tested positive since the competition resumed in empty stadiums.Madrid leads the Spanish league with four games left.___More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sportslast_img read more