Photos: This Is The Most-Embarrassing Field Rush Of The Season

first_imgNorthwestern Wildcats' football stadium.EVANSTON, IL – SEPTEMBER 29: A general view of Ryan Field as the Northwestern Wildcats take on the Indiana Hoosiers on September 29, 2012 in Evanston, Illinois. Northwestern defeated Indiana 44-29. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)On Saturday afternoon, No. 20 Wisconsin walked into Evanston, Illinois as a four-point favorite. Four hours later, the team walked out with its third loss of the season after Northwestern dominated the Badgers.The Wildcats now own a significant hold in the Big Ten West – which will get even stronger if Penn State takes care of Iowa later this afternoon. Northwestern owned both sides of the ball en route to a 31-17 win.After the game was over, the Northwestern faithful did what any program who just took down a top-25 program would do – they rushed the field.Unlike the team’s win over Wisconsin, the field rush was less than impressive.Take a look.Lol Northwestern is rushing the field. pic.twitter.com/DKfj0T4pIk— Evan Flood (@Evan_Flood) October 27, 2018Sure, winning a game against a rival while said rival is ranked in the AP and Coaches’ Polls is great, but if you’re going to rush the field, at least cover a significant portion of it.Next up for Northwestern is a home game against Notre Dame. We’d expect to see a better field rush if the Wildcats can take down the Fighting Irish.last_img read more

Province Supports Active Transportation in Port Hawkesbury

Quotes: The Town of Port Hawkesbury, through the Destination Reeves Street project, has a vision of an integrated plan that will provide safe, convenient, accessible and comfortable mobility for all users. Our partnership with the Department of Energy and Mines is extremely important to us in realizing our vision. Brenda Chisholm Beaton, mayor, Town of Port Hawkesbury Quick Facts: Pedestrians and cyclists in Port Hawkesbury will soon have access to more sustainable transportation options for the town’s busiest street, with support from the province’s Connect2 stream of the Low Carbon Communities program. Energy and Mines Minister Derek Mombourquette announced today, Sept. 24, an $100,000 investment to the town of Port Hawkesbury to develop a 1.6 kilometre off-road connector trail from Pitt Street to the Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC) Strait Area Campus on Reeves Street. “I am looking forward to seeing the benefits that the new pedestrian pathway will bring to NSCC students, the community and local business,“ said Mr. Mombourquette. “By making investments in active transportation options across the province, we are helping to build healthier, cleaner and more accessible communities and that goes a long way in building a stronger province.” The investment will cover phase one of the town’s Destination Reeves Street project, a three-year project that will also include a network of interconnecting bicycle systems, streetscape improvements and improved access between Reeves Street and the commercial district. Connect2 is the Department of Energy and Mines clean transportation grant program the program funds groups that want to build routes for trips between key points in a community, or promote options like ridesharing the province has awarded over $5.4 million to 140 kilometres of projects over the past eight years The newly built off-road connector trail will provide bicycle and walking facilities that connect all the Town’s residential, commercial and government service areas. We believe that the Reeves Street project and the complete street concept will be transformative in many ways, including how our citizens and visitors move through the community. Terry Doyle, chief administrative officer, Town of Port Hawkesbury Additional Resources: Low Carbon Communities and Connect2 Program: https://novascotia.ca/low-carbon-communities/ This project is such a great investment in providing safe, sustainable alternate routes for our students and employees in their commute to and from the campus. We’ve been pleased to be a part of the extensive efforts in connecting our NSCC community closer to town. Tom Gunn, principal, NSCC Strait Area Campus -30- read more

Mine automation starting to take hold RFC Ambrian says

first_imgIn its second report in a series on innovation and new technology in the mining industry, RFC Ambrian has tackled the subject of autonomous mining equipment, which, the authors say, has reached an “important level of maturity”.The report considered both surface and underground equipment, but most notably surface mine haulage trucks where there has been an area of significant focus for major mining companies.As the authors said: “This has reached an important level of maturity, although it is still evolving and its penetration across the industry is still in its infancy.”AHSThe Autonomous Haulage Systems (AHS) have evolved from improvements in GPS for positioning and navigation, developments in sensors and detection –particularly radar and LiDAR, improved computing power and on-board monitoring, faster and more reliable networks and internet connection, and the development of effective and accurate algorithms and software, the authors said.“AHS has appeared , first, at large mine operations where the benefits have the largest impacts, due to the high component of fixed costs in an AHS operation, and in developed countries where there is a shortage of skilled workers and labour costs are higher,” they said.Outlining the potential benefits of AHS is straightforward, but finding hard data to support it is more difficult, according to the authors.“Companies have made suggestions about the scale of improvement, but they are light on detail, definitions are not clear, and the data varies between companies,” the authors said.Suggested improvements in productivity have come from Caterpillar (15-20%), Fortescue Metals Group (30%), Komatsu (15%), and Rio Tinto (15%), according to the authors.“These improvements are still meaningful, and corporate companies would argue that every mine is different and that the mining companies and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) that have so far implemented AHS have the right to guard this proprietary information and hold on to the competitive advantage,” the authors said.Autonomy in other surface equipmentThe authors said they are also now seeing this same technology used to automate other operations in the surface mine. This includes drill rigs, dozers, loaders and ancillary equipment.“Much of this equipment is currently, at best, semi-autonomous, although a few mines have implemented fully-autonomous drill rigs and dozers,” they noted.“Moving this equipment to full autonomy offers significant production improvements, although the scale of actual savings is not likely to be as great as those achieved with AHS,” the authors said.“However, we have not yet seen quantified the downstream benefits of the resultant improved drilling and blasting.“The automation of earth moving machines provides another step to increased productivity within the mine. However, loaders face additional challenges as a result of the variability of the loading face and the risk of collisions with the haulage trucks.”Due to the complex nature of the bucket-media interaction, developing automatic loading functions that are better than or equal to expert manual drivers with regard to performance is a highly difficult task, according to the authors.“As a result, fully-autonomous loading is not yet commercially available. Some observers suggest that the implementation of fully-autonomous surface loading is still some five years away, while others believe that full automation is unlikely.”Underground miningWhen it comes to underground mining, the authors of the report said, as with surface mining, full autonomy remains the goal.“Mining companies and contractors are constantly looking to use technological developments to better utilise their investment in equipment and human resources and improve safety,” the authors said. “Particular features of traditional underground mines are: long unproductive periods caused by re-entry times required for operators after blasting; and higher health and safety risks due to geotechnical and environmental challenges.“The use of autonomy underground aims to increase the productivity of the equipment and improve the safety of the operators.”While the aims remain the same, full autonomy in the underground mine is not as advanced as in the surface mine, according to the authors.“Haul trucks are used less frequently in underground mines, although a few mines are using haul trucks with AHS. More underground mines perform a short cycle of loading, hauling and dumping from a draw point to a tipping point with LHD equipment.“Implementation of autonomous systems underground for LHDs is occurring, however, as with surface loading, one of the major hurdles to automating LHDs is replacing human judgement required for filling the bucket.”This has seen full autonomy being used for the hauling and dumping cycle, but semi-autonomy usually used for loading, according to the authors. “Successful trials of fully- autonomous LHDs have been achieved and Sandvik i-series now offers an automated bucket filling assistant as a standard function,” they said.Underground drilling operations, meanwhile, are achieving increased levels of autonomy but are also presently only semi-autonomous.Robotic rail operationsThe authors then looked at autonomous rail haulage systems, a segment of the market that has gained in prominence in the past few years thanks to initiatives such as Rio Tinto’s AutoHaul in the Pilbara of Western Australia.The authors said: “There has been some form of automation on worldwide metro systems for many years, but one area where autonomous technology has yet to gain a foothold is rail freight. Trials are underway in Holland and Germany but implementing autonomous train driving on a complex rail network, with passenger trains and freight trains, is more difficult than on a metro system.”The one exception to this is in the mining sector and AutoHaul, they said, where Rio has completed commissioning of the world’s first fully-autonomous, long distance, heavy-haul rail network which is now in full operation.Pace of implementationDespite the acclaimed success and the relative level of maturity of the technology, the wider implementation of AHS does not appear to be happening very fast, the authors argue.“The systems of both the two main suppliers (Caterpillar and Komatsu) are well proven and have delivered positive results, although, according to consultants, both systems also have examples of less-than-expected performance.“Nevertheless, the technical issues appear relatively minor and there is interest right across the industry but, in spite of the potentially significant benefits, more mines are not now using AHS.”There are a number of likely reasons for this, the authors said, explaining that one of the most important is a lack of skilled personnel.“We believe there is a lack of in-depth knowledge of the technology and limited personnel with the requisite experience, skills, and training throughout the industry’s hierarchy,” they said.“Further, there is a shortage of skilled autonomous operators, developers, and consultants, some of who are moving to the autonomous auto market.”Important factors in the success of AHS appear to be the level of management commitment, planning, and focus in the implementation, with the best results reported from well-operated mining sites, the authors said.“Another factor is likely to be limitations on equipment supply from OEMs for new equipment and truck conversions, either due to manufacturing backlogs or maybe market caution, limiting investment. This is allowing the OEMs to be more selective in their customers.”The authors cautioned: “However, if the existing suppliers do not develop additional capacity quick enough this could create opportunities for additional entrants in to the market.”Capital availability in the mining industry could also be an issue holding back AHS advancement, they said, although it is less tight than it has been in recent years.“Certainly, some lower-margin operations might struggle to finance the capital, although the uplift in relative profitability could be transformational, with relatively quick paybacks,” they said.And the historical conservatism of the mining industry is also likely to be a factor, the authors said.“There is still a natural reluctance within the industry to adopt new or unproven technology due to the high capital cost involved and the potential operational and reputational risks involved.“This will be compounded if the organisation has limited experience and limited access to the technology.”You can read the full report here.last_img read more