NSBI Approves Payroll Rebate

Quick facts: payroll rebates are designed in a way that the tax revenue generated for the province by the new jobs in Nova Scotia is always more than the amount of the rebate payroll rebates are only paid after a business has generated actual payroll for the Nova Scotia economy for every dollar a company spends on the new jobs it receives between five and 10 cents back when a company submits an annual rebate claim it must send NSBI audited information that confirms the number of jobs it created that year payroll rebates are paid through the Strategic Investment Fund Information on NSBI transactions can be found at www.novascotiabusiness.com/fundingdisclosures . -30- Nova Scotia Business Inc. (NSBI) has approved a business development incentive in the form of a payroll rebate for VERB Interactive Inc (VERB). Established in Halifax in 2004, VERB is a full-service digital marketing agency serving leading global brands in the travel and hospitality industry. The company is expanding its Halifax operations and has a second location in Victoria, B.C. VERB has the potential to create up to 130 jobs under the five-year payroll rebate agreement. Based on the maximum growth forecast of the agreement, NSBI estimates the company could spend $24.3 million in salaries. It is also estimated the new employees would contribute provincial tax revenues of $3.113 million through their income and consumption taxes. As a result, the company would earn a rebate up to $1.458 million over five years. VERB will be eligible for a smaller rebate if it creates fewer than 130 new jobs. read more

New School Year More Supports for Students

government has invested $30 million over the past two years to support 364 inclusive education specialists all schools with a Grade 1 class will have access to the Reading Recovery program the Nova Scotia Before and After Program, for children and students from pre-primary to Grade 6, is available at 42 locations this fall bus service is being offered to eligible pre-primary children at 56 sites this fall and will be available provincewide in September 2020 -30- Thousands of new and returning students across the province will benefit from greater access to programs and services this year “The start of a new school year is always an exciting time for students and families,” said Zach Churchill, Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development. “I want to wish our new and returning students, teachers and school staff a school year filled with learning, fun and success.” As part of the new model of inclusive education in the province, 173 more inclusive education specialists, teachers and non-teaching staff will bring the total number of new supports to 364. Two programs will also be rolled out provincewide. Reading Recovery helps children in Grade 1 who are struggling significantly with reading and writing by working with a reading recovery teacher and one-on-one lessons. SchoolsPlus helps students and families access various supports including mental health services. In addition, the Pre-primary Program will be available in 201 school communities this fall. Busing for eligible pre-primary children and the Nova Scotia Before and After Program will be available in some pre-primary locations this year. Quick Facts: https://Novascotia.ca/educationsystem https://Novascotia.ca/preprimary Additional Resources: https://Novascotia.ca/bap read more

Mine automation starting to take hold RFC Ambrian says

first_imgIn its second report in a series on innovation and new technology in the mining industry, RFC Ambrian has tackled the subject of autonomous mining equipment, which, the authors say, has reached an “important level of maturity”.The report considered both surface and underground equipment, but most notably surface mine haulage trucks where there has been an area of significant focus for major mining companies.As the authors said: “This has reached an important level of maturity, although it is still evolving and its penetration across the industry is still in its infancy.”AHSThe Autonomous Haulage Systems (AHS) have evolved from improvements in GPS for positioning and navigation, developments in sensors and detection –particularly radar and LiDAR, improved computing power and on-board monitoring, faster and more reliable networks and internet connection, and the development of effective and accurate algorithms and software, the authors said.“AHS has appeared , first, at large mine operations where the benefits have the largest impacts, due to the high component of fixed costs in an AHS operation, and in developed countries where there is a shortage of skilled workers and labour costs are higher,” they said.Outlining the potential benefits of AHS is straightforward, but finding hard data to support it is more difficult, according to the authors.“Companies have made suggestions about the scale of improvement, but they are light on detail, definitions are not clear, and the data varies between companies,” the authors said.Suggested improvements in productivity have come from Caterpillar (15-20%), Fortescue Metals Group (30%), Komatsu (15%), and Rio Tinto (15%), according to the authors.“These improvements are still meaningful, and corporate companies would argue that every mine is different and that the mining companies and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) that have so far implemented AHS have the right to guard this proprietary information and hold on to the competitive advantage,” the authors said.Autonomy in other surface equipmentThe authors said they are also now seeing this same technology used to automate other operations in the surface mine. This includes drill rigs, dozers, loaders and ancillary equipment.“Much of this equipment is currently, at best, semi-autonomous, although a few mines have implemented fully-autonomous drill rigs and dozers,” they noted.“Moving this equipment to full autonomy offers significant production improvements, although the scale of actual savings is not likely to be as great as those achieved with AHS,” the authors said.“However, we have not yet seen quantified the downstream benefits of the resultant improved drilling and blasting.“The automation of earth moving machines provides another step to increased productivity within the mine. However, loaders face additional challenges as a result of the variability of the loading face and the risk of collisions with the haulage trucks.”Due to the complex nature of the bucket-media interaction, developing automatic loading functions that are better than or equal to expert manual drivers with regard to performance is a highly difficult task, according to the authors.“As a result, fully-autonomous loading is not yet commercially available. Some observers suggest that the implementation of fully-autonomous surface loading is still some five years away, while others believe that full automation is unlikely.”Underground miningWhen it comes to underground mining, the authors of the report said, as with surface mining, full autonomy remains the goal.“Mining companies and contractors are constantly looking to use technological developments to better utilise their investment in equipment and human resources and improve safety,” the authors said. “Particular features of traditional underground mines are: long unproductive periods caused by re-entry times required for operators after blasting; and higher health and safety risks due to geotechnical and environmental challenges.“The use of autonomy underground aims to increase the productivity of the equipment and improve the safety of the operators.”While the aims remain the same, full autonomy in the underground mine is not as advanced as in the surface mine, according to the authors.“Haul trucks are used less frequently in underground mines, although a few mines are using haul trucks with AHS. More underground mines perform a short cycle of loading, hauling and dumping from a draw point to a tipping point with LHD equipment.“Implementation of autonomous systems underground for LHDs is occurring, however, as with surface loading, one of the major hurdles to automating LHDs is replacing human judgement required for filling the bucket.”This has seen full autonomy being used for the hauling and dumping cycle, but semi-autonomy usually used for loading, according to the authors. “Successful trials of fully- autonomous LHDs have been achieved and Sandvik i-series now offers an automated bucket filling assistant as a standard function,” they said.Underground drilling operations, meanwhile, are achieving increased levels of autonomy but are also presently only semi-autonomous.Robotic rail operationsThe authors then looked at autonomous rail haulage systems, a segment of the market that has gained in prominence in the past few years thanks to initiatives such as Rio Tinto’s AutoHaul in the Pilbara of Western Australia.The authors said: “There has been some form of automation on worldwide metro systems for many years, but one area where autonomous technology has yet to gain a foothold is rail freight. Trials are underway in Holland and Germany but implementing autonomous train driving on a complex rail network, with passenger trains and freight trains, is more difficult than on a metro system.”The one exception to this is in the mining sector and AutoHaul, they said, where Rio has completed commissioning of the world’s first fully-autonomous, long distance, heavy-haul rail network which is now in full operation.Pace of implementationDespite the acclaimed success and the relative level of maturity of the technology, the wider implementation of AHS does not appear to be happening very fast, the authors argue.“The systems of both the two main suppliers (Caterpillar and Komatsu) are well proven and have delivered positive results, although, according to consultants, both systems also have examples of less-than-expected performance.“Nevertheless, the technical issues appear relatively minor and there is interest right across the industry but, in spite of the potentially significant benefits, more mines are not now using AHS.”There are a number of likely reasons for this, the authors said, explaining that one of the most important is a lack of skilled personnel.“We believe there is a lack of in-depth knowledge of the technology and limited personnel with the requisite experience, skills, and training throughout the industry’s hierarchy,” they said.“Further, there is a shortage of skilled autonomous operators, developers, and consultants, some of who are moving to the autonomous auto market.”Important factors in the success of AHS appear to be the level of management commitment, planning, and focus in the implementation, with the best results reported from well-operated mining sites, the authors said.“Another factor is likely to be limitations on equipment supply from OEMs for new equipment and truck conversions, either due to manufacturing backlogs or maybe market caution, limiting investment. This is allowing the OEMs to be more selective in their customers.”The authors cautioned: “However, if the existing suppliers do not develop additional capacity quick enough this could create opportunities for additional entrants in to the market.”Capital availability in the mining industry could also be an issue holding back AHS advancement, they said, although it is less tight than it has been in recent years.“Certainly, some lower-margin operations might struggle to finance the capital, although the uplift in relative profitability could be transformational, with relatively quick paybacks,” they said.And the historical conservatism of the mining industry is also likely to be a factor, the authors said.“There is still a natural reluctance within the industry to adopt new or unproven technology due to the high capital cost involved and the potential operational and reputational risks involved.“This will be compounded if the organisation has limited experience and limited access to the technology.”You can read the full report here.last_img read more