ND water initiative ends with showing

first_imgWith this Saturday’s showing of the documentary film “One Water,” student government’s Global Water Initiative culminated a year-long series of events and fundraisers aimed towards addressing the world’s clean water crisis.According to the Global Water Initiative’s final report, 2.5 billion people all over the world live without adequate sanitation. In addition, one in six persons on earth lives without access to potable water.Former student body vice president Cynthia Weber believes the project achieved a lot in its year of existence.“I think that it was successful on two fronts: raising awareness on a fixable issuesomewhere else in the world and also using Notre Dame resources to do so,” she said. “Not only was it our goal to help fix wells, but also to educate the campus.”Throughout the course of the year, various service organizations have put on a number of events to both raise awareness of the issue and collect funds to be donated to the non-profit Water Project, the partner organization to Notre Dame’s Global Water Initiative. In total, at least $4,464 will be donated to the Water Project, which provides sustainable, safe water by fixing broken wells in the African nation of Sierra Leone.Rachel Roseberry, co-director of the Global Water Initiative along with Justin Pham, said that the program, the first of its kind for Notre Dame, was a great achievement for the campus.“I think that it is important that Student Government showed this year that it can focus on a single service initiative for the entire year,” she said. “It’s a pretty unique model that hadn’t been done before.”In addition to fundraisers put on by student organizations, members and organizations of Notre Dame’s academic community such as the Ford Family Program in Human Development Studies and Solidarity at the Kellogg Institute helped educate students on the issue of the global water crisis.Weber said having widespread campus participation strengthened student bonds over the course of the school year.“Groups on campus that normally didn’t connect were brought together so it helped build our community as well as helping the world,” she said.Roseberry mentioned two events in particular that stood out in terms of raising awareness and funding for the global water crisis, in addition to demonstrating Notre Dame’s sense of community giving.“Howard Hall’s ‘Totter for Water’ was a fantastic event that raised over $2,000,” she said. “The Benefit CD in February with 18 student artists was another way the Notre Dame community came together to raise money for the world’s clean water crisis.”Weber said while the Global Water Initiative was coming to a close with the end of last year’s Student Government term, the Notre Dame campus should expect a similar program after the success of this year’s series of events and fundraisers.“This particular initiative won’t be continued but something similar to it will be next year,” she said.last_img read more

Class participates in ConvergeUs

first_imgStudents in the Fundamentals of Business Thinking class participated in the inaugural ConvergeUs forum this week, a unique conference uniting members of the technology and service sectors. Students who participated in the forum used lessons from the classroom to understand and consider solutions for the prominent social concerns identified by the conference. Senior John McCabe said he was excited to participate in ConvergeUS. “It’s neat to be forward-thinking and look for substantive change rather than being stuck just reading a textbook,” he said. “This is the only class where I have ever had so much outside classroom experience, and Professor Sucec [the Fundamentals of Business Thinking instructor] really tries to provide us with these learning opportunities.” Sucec said he was also excited about his class’s involvement with the conference. “Students have the opportunity to be involved in a project which comingles relevant business issues with critical social concerns,” Sucec said. “In addition, they have the opportunity to come into contact with educators and successful entrepreneurs … (and) see how they attempt to deal with very prominent issues in the marketplace.” Senior Patrick Kelly said he enjoyed learning about new technology through the forum. “It’s a really good opportunity for us to understand social innovation and the leading technology within social innovation,” Kelly said. “There is a lot of new technology, which is really exciting. It’s a very unique opportunity to view a relatively new initiative.” McCabe and Kelly, who are working together on a project for the class, have chosen to address the youth reading initiative. “Learning should be enjoyable and fun, not something to be afraid of, and I believe the prevalence of technology in the classrooms will help bring back this enjoyment,” McCabe said. McCabe also said he embraced the approach of ConvergeUS toward solving social issues. “ConvergeUS is committed to a blueprint, which is different than a lot of nonprofits who have a vision but not necessarily a means to get them to fruition,” he said. Kelly said the blueprint method would be important for the pair’s class project. “Our goal is to provide a blueprint with a creative approach, which would ideally lead to a significant and feasible solution to implement and address some of the social problems surrounding the deficit in America’s youth reading programs,” Kelly said. Professor Charles Crowell, director of the CAPP program, said he views the class’s involvement with ConvergeUS both as an important opportunity for students in the class and the University’s social concerns in general. “It gives the class the opportunity to partner, right now in a very limited sense but hopefully in a larger sense eventually, with a company geared toward solving social issues,” he said. “It’s a very important partnership and another opportunity for ND students to apply their time, talent and energy to important social issues.” The partnership between ConvergeUS and Notre Dame naturally developed from their shared social concerns, Crowell said. “If there ever was a University tailor-made to address these issues, it is Notre Damlast_img read more

Campus reacts to hate crime

first_imgTwo acts of racial harassment were committed against black student groups between Feb. 14 and 20 in the LaFortune Student Center. According to a statement emailed to the student body Friday, fried chicken parts were placed in the mailboxes of the Black Students Association (BSA) and African Student Association (ASA). The Office of Student Affairs is now working with the two student organizations to present the incidents to the Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) for investigation. Vice president for Student Affairs Fr. Thomas Doyle, vice president and associate provost Don Pope-Davis and chair of the Black Students Association Brittany Suggs signed the joint statement. “These acts of harassment are a clear violation of University policy, unacceptable in every way, and will not be tolerated on our campus,” the statement said. Iris Outlaw, director of Multicultural Students Programs and Services (MSPS), said these incidents reflect the need to report discrimination at Notre Dame. “Discriminatory harassment is a serious matter and depending on the severity can lead to dismissal,” she said. Suggs said most of campus, not just minority groups, responded strongly to the two incidents. “Whether or not the acts were intended by the offender as harmless pranks, or as … harassment or hate crimes, … the greater Notre Dame community perspective by known parties that has developed around the issue is one of sheer disgust and sadness, along with shock and confusion,” she said. In addition to occurring during Black History Month, Suggs said she was troubled the incidents perpetuate harmful stereotypes. “In the black community, we aim to embrace our similarities while, most importantly, celebrating our differences. Hence, the frustration is obvious,” she said.  “Just because the mailboxes had the words ‘black’ and ‘African’ in the labels, the [perpetrators] assumed that these groups were one in the same, which is far from the case.” ASA vice president Chris Moore said finding a fried chicken strip in the club’s mailbox initially did not prompt him to view the incident as a hate crime. “Given that Africans aren’t typically stereotyped as being as fond of fried chicken like society tends to depicts black Americans, and that this appeared to be an isolated incident, none of us really thought of it was racial intimidation but rather a a sign of disrespect [and] impoliteness,” he said. “As we now know, this was regrettably not the case.” In addition to the investigation, student leaders, staff and faculty are developing a “comprehensive response” to the specific incidents that occurred, as well as unreported occasions of intolerance, the statement said. This response will take “various forms.” “We seek to use it as a means to educate our community and create awareness of the fact that, even at this point in our national history, hatred and bigotry continue to exist and must be combated,” the statement said. Suggs said the BSA has developed a three-step plan of action with the ASA and MSPS. The first step is to address the situation in the black community; second, to address the incident with campus administration and third, to increase awareness and evoke action among the Notre Dame community. “A critical component to this proposal includes urging the administrative officials in the Provost Office through formal letters and petitions to establish a cultural competency requirement that spans a semester beyond the current two-day presentation, which only serves to begin a conversation in regards to diversity,” she said.  “This component should be a top priority to the University.” In the immediate future, Suggs said there are plans to host a campus-wide town hall meeting titled “A Call to Action in Regards to the Discriminatory Incident.” The meeting is scheduled for March 5 in the Andrews Auditorium of Geddes Hall. “The purpose for the town hall meeting will not only serve as a campus-wide opportunity to discuss the incident and other related cases, but also to serve as productive means of understanding the various perspectives of the student body concerning such incidents and formulating a concrete plan of action,” she said. Though immediate action has been taken to address the situation, Suggs said she does not view the incident as a “quick-fix.” Rather, she said this is an opportunity to bring necessary change to the University community. “The plans of action proposed will require a great deal of revision, time and patience in the interest of bringing about effective implementation that will make for a sustainable modification in the campus climate and culture of Our Lady’s University,” she said.  “With campus-wide interest, action and support, we can work, jointly, to bring about these changes that are long overdue and have been swept under the rug too many times before.” Moore said he hopes the campus engages in dialogue on the subject of race at Notre Dame, rather than responding with anger. “I believe that many students, faculty and administrators would like to see Notre Dame as a campus that embraces all of its students,” he said. “The reality, however, is that overall experience and quality of campus life for many students is unfortunately shaped by their minority status on campus be it racial, ethnic or religious. “Without actual dialogue regarding the subject, we cannot make progress as a community to ensure that inclusiveness is materialized for all.” Anyone with information on these incidents is asked to contact NDSP at 574-631-5555.last_img read more

Week educates campus about Haiti

This week, several Notre Dame campus organizations will hold a variety of events in support of Haiti Awareness Week and the work the University does in the poverty-stricken Caribbean nation. She said the week’s most important event is Saturday’s Haiti Working Group Conference, titled “Transforming Dialogue into Action: Passion with a Purpose in Haiti.” The conference will feature perspectives from Catholic Relief Services representatives, InterVol and the Notre Dame Haiti Program, among others. “This week, ND Fighting NTDs is having a TOMS shoe giveaway, and Friends of the Orphans is having sign-ups for a 24-hour fast next week to benefit an orphanage,” she said. “I’m actually Haitian, and I heard about the Haiti Working Group after being abroad,” she said. “I got interested in some of the things they were doing and think it is a great way to show the culture and teach students more about Haiti.” Senior Megan Stoffer, leader of the Haiti Working Group, said this week allows all Haiti-focused campus groups to collaborate and share the work they do with each other. Mathurin said she is very excited about the conference because it presents an opportunity to educate the public about development and aid in Haiti, as well as elements of Haitian culture, including a concert by the Chicago-based Haitian group D-Lux. ND-8, the student organization that works toward achieving the Millennium Development goals, will help promote greater understanding about microfinance and the tourism industry in Haiti, Stoffer said. Senior Tania Mathurin, a member of the Haiti Working Group, said she thinks this week is an excellent way to educate Notre Dame students about the ongoing issues and problems in Haiti. Senior Tania Mathurin, a member of the Haiti Working Group, said she thinks this week is an excellent way to educate Notre Dame students about the ongoing issues and problems in Haiti. The Kellogg Institute’s Haiti Working Group is also collaborating with the other groups on campus to sponsor lecturers and other events throughout the week, Stoffer said. “The Haiti [Working Group] Conference is bringing together a bunch of Midwestern colleges with Haiti groups, and there will be a lecture from a doctor who goes to Haiti and discussion [about it],” she said. “There will be a panel discussion geared towards how students can be effective with the aid and development they get involved in.” The Kellogg Institute’s Haiti Working Group is also collaborating with the other groups on campus to sponsor lecturers and other events throughout the week, Stoffer said. Sponsored by the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, the Haiti Working Group, Friends of the Orphans, the Notre Dame Haiti Program, ND Fighting NTDs and ND-8, Haiti Awareness Week will feature cultural events, lectures on development and a conference focused on the country’s unique issues. She said the week’s most important event is Saturday’s Haiti Working Group Conference, titled “Transforming Dialogue into Action: Passion with a Purpose in Haiti.” The conference will feature perspectives from Catholic Relief Services representatives, InterVol and the Notre Dame Haiti Program, among others. “This week, ND Fighting NTDs is having a TOMS shoe giveaway, and Friends of the Orphans is having sign-ups for a 24-hour fast next week to benefit an orphanage,” she said. ND-8, the student organization that works toward achieving the Millennium Development goals, will help promote greater understanding about microfinance and the tourism industry in Haiti, Stoffer said. “The Haiti [Working Group] Conference is bringing together a bunch of Midwestern colleges with Haiti groups, and there will be a lecture from a doctor who goes to Haiti and discussion [about it],” she said. “There will be a panel discussion geared towards how students can be effective with the aid and development they get involved in.” “I’m actually Haitian, and I heard about the Haiti Working Group after being abroad,” she said. “I got interested in some of the things they were doing and think it is a great way to show the culture and teach students more about Haiti.” “This is a great way not only to learn but also to learn more about effective ways to do development and aid,” she said. “I’m also really looking forward to the Haitian band that’s playing at the conference. It will be different and exciting.,This week, several Notre Dame campus organizations will hold a variety of events in support of Haiti Awareness Week and the work the University does in the poverty-stricken Caribbean nation. Sponsored by the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, the Haiti Working Group, Friends of the Orphans, the Notre Dame Haiti Program, ND Fighting NTDs and ND-8, Haiti Awareness Week will feature cultural events, lectures on development and a conference focused on the country’s unique issues. Senior Megan Stoffer, leader of the Haiti Working Group, said this week allows all Haiti-focused campus groups to collaborate and share the work they do with each other. Mathurin said she is very excited about the conference because it presents an opportunity to educate the public about development and aid in Haiti, as well as elements of Haitian culture, including a concert by the Chicago-based Haitian group D-Lux. “This is a great way not only to learn but also to learn more about effective ways to do development and aid,” she said. “I’m also really looking forward to the Haitian band that’s playing at the conference. It will be different and exciting. read more

Community remembers graduate student

first_imgGraduate student Michael Thigpen had two rules to live by. “He would never judge people, his No. 1 rule was, ‘No judgment shall be passed,’” senior Shawn Steurer said. “And he taught us if it’s not fun, don’t do it.” Thigpen, a first-year master’s student enrolled on the Global Health Training program, died unexpectedly earlier this week and was discovered early Tuesday morning in his off-campus residence.  Thigpen, a native of Monument, Colo., was 23. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Colorado and planned to apply to medical school after he completed his one-year program at Notre Dame. Friends remembered him as an avid climber, enthusiastic about life and always smiling. Steurer, the president of the Notre Dame Climbing Club, first met Thigpen when the graduate student joined the group at the beginning of the semester. “He was very energetic, which was awesome. … The news was sad, finding out about his death, but I’ve caught myself smiling thinking about him because all the memories. He smiled a lot, told a lot of jokes.” Steurer recalled the club’s fall break trip to climb in Boulder in Thigpen’s home state. He remembered one occasion when Thigpen decided to test his coordination by climbing an entire route with tape over one eye, describing him as a “wild card.” Thigpen’s antics always made their club trip more enjoyable, Steurer said. “He always had a positive outlook and when I was stressing about various things on the trip, like how we were going to pack things in the car, he was always very lax and had the mindset that it was going to work out,” Steurer said. “When everyone was stressed, thinking things would not work out, he brought positive energy and fun.” Thigpen was a musician who had performed professionally, and Steurer remembered the mandolin he insisted on bringing to Colorado with the club. “He loved music,” Steurer said. “Although the car was jam-packed with six people and a van and all their gear for the trip, he insisted on bringing [the mandolin.] He played by the campfire.” The first thing junior Chris Glueck saw when he met graduate student Michael Thigpen at the rock-climbing wall with the Climbing Club was his hair. The second was his smile. “The first thing I noticed about Michael was his hair because his hair was down to his shoulders,” Glueck said. “The second thing I noticed about Michael was his smile. He had a huge smile. … He’s just a ball of energy.” Glueck laughed at the memory of Thigpen leading Steurer in playing their instruments around the campfire over fall break. He remembered seeing Thigpen on Friday at a dinner off campus and watching him meet the new people around him with ease. “I don’t think he knew anybody there but by the end of the night, he knew everybody there,” he said. “I don’t think I ever saw him without a ridiculous smile on his face.” The Climbing Club gathered at the Grotto to remember Thigpen on Tuesday night, Glueck said, and members of the Notre Dame community gathered Wednesday for Mass to celebrate his life. University President Fr. John Jenkins presided over the Mass, and director of Campus Ministry James King delivered the homily. When he spoke, King evoked an image from that day’s Gospel – the image of Christ on the cross. “We can place ourselves in that scene and wonder what must have gone through [Mary’s] mind,” King said during his homily. “Was she thinking of him as a carefree child that she once held in her arms? … Was she standing there wondering if there was something she could have, should have, done to deter him from the road upon which he as set out on his way down from God? “There are no real answers, there are no good answers, to any of those questions no matter how much she or us may turn them around in our minds. Because there is simply no good answer to the question of why a young man dies early, whether his name is Jesus Christ or Michael Thigpen. We only know that, as Lamentations says, our souls are not at peace.” King offered the support of the University community to those gathered in Thigpen’s memory. “For those of you who were Michael’s friends, fellow students, members of the Climbing Club, faculty, staff, I would say this, ‘Weep and mourn,’” King said. “But I would also say hold on to one another, as you did yesterday, as you have today, as you may need to tomorrow and for some tomorrows to come. “Hold on to one another and know that you are embraced too by this community, this Notre Dame family, and that you are also enveloped in the love of Mary our Mother, Our Lady of Notre Dame, who knew herself what it was like to weep and mourn.”last_img read more

Presidential Taskforce meets for the first time

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Presidential Taskforce on Sexual Assault held its first meeting last Friday, followed by College President Carol Ann Mooney sending an email Tuesday to the College community regarding the topics discussed at Friday’s meeting.In order to keep the community updated in a more timely manner, Mooney said she will plan to send an email summarizing each meeting.Mooney said in Tuesday’s email that the taskforce had reviewed current procedures for reporting sexual assault, and it was noted that the Code of Student Conduct is being revised this fall to incorporate changes in the law.Additionally, three subcommittees were established to report to the main group at each meeting of the taskforce.The first committee, focused on education of sexual assault, will be chaired by Assistant Director of Alumnae Relations Shay Jolly. Other members include junior Michaela Gaughan, junior Julianne Olivieri and professor of history and gender and women’s studies Jamie Wagman.The second committee will be focused on procedures at Saint Mary’s and chaired by professor of psychology Bettina Spencer. Other members include librarian Ula Gaha, junior Caylin McCallick and senior Bridget Venard.The third committee is the support committee, chaired by Director of Campus Ministry Regina Wilson. Other members include sophomore Lydia Lorenc and senior Bri O’Brien.College counsel Rich Nugent will act as a general resource for committees, according to Mooney’s email.The next meeting will be after fall break, but the date is to be determined.Full meeting minutes will be available in the College’s portal after they have been officially approved by the taskforce at its subsequent meeting, Mooney said in the email.Tags: Presidential Taskforce, sexual assaultlast_img read more

Glee Club members, alumni reunite for centennial concert

first_imgMore than 500 Glee Club alumni and current members will take the stage at the Morris Performing Arts Center in South Bend on Friday night to celebrate a century’s worth of performances on campus and around the globe.Current Glee Club president senior Stuart Streit said alumni from as far back as the 1940s and from all areas of the country are coming to participate in the centennial concert and additional reunion weekend activities.Photo courtesy of Soren Kyhl “It’s been really cool to see what a footprint the Glee Club has now, after a hundred years,” he said.The club has been planning the reunion weekend for nearly two years, he said.“It’s really been a lot of works by alums, they’ve really been outstanding,” Streit said. “We have two young alums who live here in South Bend who have been handling a crazy amount of logistics. We have some older alums who have been working on it from remote locations.”Streit said involvement in the preparations for the weekend has given him a much greater awareness of the historic nature of the group.“I think that it wasn’t something I appreciated my first three years of the group, and since being thrown into event planning, I’ve really gotten a better grasp on the history of the Glee Club,” he said.The Glee Club was formed in 1915 after a Notre Dame student visiting Harvard saw their glee club perform and decided to start a singing society at Notre Dame, Streit said.“In the ’40s, Dean Pedtke became the director and he ended up serving for almost 40 years,” he said. “It was during that time it really became entrenched, traditionally within Notre Dame the way it is now.”Today, the Glee Club performs multiple concerts in the fall and spring semesters, as well as touring internationally every other year and domestically twice a year, Streit said. However, Friday’s concert will be different from the Glee Club’s standard concert.“This is a really exciting concert. … We’re singing pieces from each of the four main eras based on different directors,” he said. “It’s a lot of Notre Dame songs, a lot of popular choral music. You can see the way not only the way the music of the Glee Club evolved, but also how Notre Dame evolved over time. It’s a really neat look into the history of Notre Dame.”Streit said the Morris Performing Arts Center also has a historic connection to Notre Dame.“It’s also just such a storied space. Our director keeps saying that 75 years ago the movie ‘Knute Rockne All American’ premiered at the Morris,” he said. “It’s cool to be singing in that space on a major anniversary for that movie, too.”Josh Bathon, who graduated in 2014 and was a member of the club for three years, said he enjoyed the sense of brotherhood that all the members shared in his time with the Club.“To this day, I am astounded that I could look upon someone and call him my brother simply because we sang together,” he said. “The profundity of this is not lost on me: familial bonds are forged in the harmony of voice. I came for the music, and stayed for the family.”Bathon said he is excited to return for the reunion weekend, especially as he will be able to sing with his uncle, Howard Bathon, who graduated in 1974.“We lived in very different times, had different peers and directors, and sang a lot of different music. But there was also a lot of music that we both sang, we stopped in some of the same places on tour, had a common vocabulary for events and songs, and shared many traditions,” he said. “For instance, in the cold days of the late autumn, we had a bonfire and hayride at a random rural Midwestern farm. I found out later that almost 40 years ago, my uncle went to the same farm with the club.”Howard Bathon said he has been anticipating the centennial reunion for several years.“The Glee Club was one of the biggest experiences in my time at Notre Dame. My best friends from Notre Dame are in the Glee Club,” he said. “When Josh told me he was going to try out for the Glee Club, I was ecstatic. … To get back together and know that guys 40 years before me and 40 years behind me sang some of the same songs that I’m singing is just the coolest thing in the world.”The Glee Club was the only singing group on campus during Howard Bathon’s time, he said, and so they performed for many different events for the University.“Notre Dame has a far better developed and well-rounded music program now than when I was here. We were kind of it,” he said. “If they wanted music for anything, we were tapped to do it.”He said highlights from his time in Glee Club included performing for football coach Frank Leahy’s national championship teams during a reunion, as well as touring in Amsterdam, Belgium and Munich.“The Glee Club was the closest thing we had to a fraternity on campus at that time,” Howard Bathon said. “We didn’t live together, but we sure did everything else together. We toured together, we sang together, we played together, we ate together and it just a tremendous experience for me.”Tom Cook, who graduated in 1988, said he is also looking forward to singing alongside his brother and father, who was president of the Glee Club in 1959.“It’s going to be a real privilege to be there with my dad and my brother because we were there at all different times,” he said. “For me, the concert is going to be really cool, meeting everyone and being on stage with everyone … but especially my dad and my brother.”Many of the men he met while a member of Glee Club turned into life-long friends, Cook said.“It was great to know all these people from all over campus, multiple years, freshmen through seniors as well as grad students,” Cook said.Tags: centennial, centennial concert, Concert, Glee Clublast_img read more

University names valedictorian, salutatorian

first_imgThe University named valedictorian Caleb “C.J.” Pine and salutatorian José Alberto Suárez in a press release Wednesday.Pine — an Arabic and peace studies major with a minor in philosophy, politics and economics (PPE) — is a member of the Glynn Family Honors program, the Phi Beta Kappa Honors Society and is a Hesburgh-Yusko Scholar at Notre Dame. He was also named a Truman Scholar and Gilman Scholar, currently holds a 3.92 cumulative grade point average (GPA) and is a four-year member of the Dean’s List.While at Notre Dame, Pine helped found both the student advocacy group Solidarity with Syria and the nonprofit organization Road to Mafraq, which “seeks to increase access to education for children impacted by conflict in the Middle East, specifically supporting Syrian and Iraqi refugees living in Jordan,” according to the press release.Suárez, another Hesburgh-Yusko Scholar and four-year member of the Dean’s List, is a computer science and engineering major with a 4.00 cumulative GPA. He was also a member of University honor societies Tau Beta Pi, Upsilon Pi Epsilon and Eta Kappa Nu. Suárez served as a resident assistant in Keenan Hall and as president of the Student International Business Council during his time at Notre Dame.Pine will deliver the valedictory address during the Commencement ceremony on May 21 at Notre Dame Stadium.Tags: Commencement 2017, salutatorian, valedictorianlast_img read more

College announces 2018 Commencement Speaker

first_imgEditor’s note: A version of this story appeared in the print edition of The Observer on March 29.Carolyn Woo, the former chief executive officer of Catholic Relief Services, will address the Saint Mary’s class of 2018 at its Commencement ceremony on May 19, according to a College press release.Woo will be awarded the College’s highest honor, an Honorary Doctor of Humanities, at the ceremony, according to the release.Woo immigrated to the United States for her studies after being born and raised in Hong Kong. She returned to her alma mater, Purdue University, as an associate professor in 1981 and as a full-time professor in 1991. According to the release, she served in several leadership roles at Purdue, as both the director of professional master’s programs in the Krannert School of Management and associate executive vice president for academic affairs.In 1997, Woo took on the role of Martin J. Gillen Dean of the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, which she held until 2011. In 2012, she began her time as the chief executive officer of Catholic Relief Services, where she served until 2016, according to the release.“Carolyn Woo embodies the spirit we strive to instill in our students: She is a woman of action,” College President Jan Cervelli said in the release. “Her career is a testament to the power of leadership that serves the greater good.”The College will also award an additional honorary degree to Sister Margaret “Peggy” O’Neill, according to the release.O’Neill has spent her life advocating for peace, according to the release. In her time working in the Diocese of San Salvador, she has promoted peace through her work with Salvadoran refugees during the civil war and creating an educational and cultural center in El Salvador that emphasized the importance of art and spiritual reflection.According to the release, she currently serves as a faculty member of Santa Clara University’s Casa de la Solidaridad in El Salvador. O’Neill had also spent over 25 years working as a theology professor in the past.O’Neill has received several honors for her work, including the 2008 Peacemaker Award of the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace and the 2008 Ciudadana Ilustre Award, according to the press release.“Sister Peggy O’Neill enriches the lives of those around her with her buoyant spirit and unflagging commitment to service,” Cervelli said in the release. “Her accompaniment of people in need serves as a shining light through darkness.”Tags: Carolyn Woo, catholic relief services, Commencement 2018, Honorary degrees, Margaret O’Neill, Saint Mary’s Commencement,Carolyn Woo, the former chief executive officer of Catholic Relief Services, will address the Saint Mary’s class of 2018 at its Commencement ceremony on May 19, according to a College press release.Woo will be awarded the College’s highest honor, an Honorary Doctor of Humanities, at the ceremony, according to the release.Woo immigrated to the United States for her studies after being born and raised in Hong Kong. She returned to her alma mater, Purdue University, as an associate professor in 1981 and as a full-time professor in 1991. According to the release, she served in several leadership roles at Purdue, as both the director of professional master’s programs in the Krannert School of Management and associate executive vice president for academic affairs.In 1997, Woo took on the role of Martin J. Gillen Dean of the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, which she held until 2011. In 2012, she began her time as the chief executive officer of Catholic Relief Services, where she served until 2016, according to the release.“Carolyn Woo embodies the spirit we strive to instill in our students: She is a woman of action,” College President Jan Cervelli said in the release. “Her career is a testament to the power of leadership that serves the greater good.”The College will also award an additional honorary degree to Sister Margaret “Peggy” O’Neill, according to the release.O’Neill has spent her life advocating for peace, according to the release. In her time working in the Diocese of San Salvador, she has promoted peace through her work with Salvadoran refugees during the civil war and creating an educational and cultural center in El Salvador that emphasized the importance of art and spiritual reflection.According to the release, she currently serves as a faculty member of Santa Clara University’s Casa de la Solidaridad in El Salvador. O’Neill had also spent over 25 years working as a theology professor in the past.O’Neill has received several honors for her work, including the 2008 Peacemaker Award of the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace and the 2008 Ciudadana Ilustre Award, according to the press release.“Sister Peggy O’Neill enriches the lives of those around her with her buoyant spirit and unflagging commitment to service,” Cervelli said in the release. “Her accompaniment of people in need serves as a shining light through darkness.”last_img read more

University welcomes transfer students

first_imgWhile Notre Dame welcomes thousands of freshmen in the class of 2022, a number of incoming students will be entering the University this Fall as upperclassmen.Erin Camilleri, the director of transfer enrollment, said this year the University is welcoming 173 transfer students out of 871 total applications. Of this year’s transfers, 66 are Gateway students who completed their freshman year at Holy Cross, she said.Camilleri said students are selected to participate in the Gateway program by their admissions officers.“Each year, our admissions team has students who they believe will be wonderful additions to the Notre Dame community but, for whatever reason, we’re not able to offer them admission in the first year class,” she said in an email.Students in the Gateway program attend Holy Cross College as freshmen and are guaranteed transfer to Notre Dame the following year if they maintain a GPA of 3.5 or higher. During their year at Holy Cross, Gateway students take classes at Notre Dame and have full access to its clubs and other on-campus activities.Sophomore Ryan McNelis attended Holy Cross as a Gateway student last year and will be joining the Notre Dame class of 2021 this fall.“I’m kind of the prototypical Notre Dame football dream kid. I grew up watching Rudy, my mom’s a Saint Mary’s grad,” he said. “So I always wanted to be at Notre Dame. Gateway gave me the chance to fulfill that.”McNelis said both Holy Cross and Notre Dame were helpful in preparing students for transfer.“I think pretty much the whole first year of Gateway is geared to make that transition as seamless as possible,” he said. “Freshman year, we have academic advisors at both Holy Cross and Notre Dame. Both sides do a great job of making sure your requirements are all in order.”The chance to experience campus life at Notre Dame helped the transition as well, McNelis said.“I think there’s nothing that eases [the transfer] more than being able to spend time on the campus you’re transferring to for an entire year beforehand,” he said.Sophomore Jordan Felicia, who also transferred via the Gateway program, also said he valued the opportunity to use both institutions as a resource.“It’s just really great to be able to be involved on both campuses,” he said. “I definitely encourage any future Gateway students to take full advantage.”Sophomore Siena Gruler, another Gateway transfer, said she was grateful for the special sense of community she felt with other students in the program.“We’re really close,” she said. “I know if I had gotten into Notre Dame as a first-year I wouldn’t have met the people that I met. I know I’ll be friends with them for the rest of my life.”McNelis said he is excited to complete his transition to Notre Dame this fall.“Honestly, I’m most looking forward to continuing everything I started last year,” he said. “I really feel like it is a natural progression, much more a continuation of something I’ve started than the start of something new.”Sophomore Matthew Benson, who also completed the Gateway program, said he looks forward to helping future Gateway students in their transition to Notre Dame.“I’m most excited to dive right into the Notre Dame culture. I’m also excited to give back and help these upcoming Gateways realize what an opportunity this actually is,” he said.Lauren Donahue, program director for new student engagement, said this year’s Welcome Weekend hosts a number of events geared specifically towards transfer students, including a reception dinner with University President Fr. John Jenkins and “ND Traditions 101”, a talk that aims to brief transfers on Notre Dame traditions.Donahue said the events were created to cater to the unique needs of transfer students and to help them integrate with the student body.“It takes a lot of courage to leave behind the familiarity of another institution and transition to a new institution,” she said in an email. “My hope is that all new students feel welcomed and celebrated as valuable members of the Notre Dame community.”Tags: Gateway Program, Holy Cross College, Transfer welcome weekend, Welcome Weekend 2018last_img read more