Political Bias in Science Media, cont.

first_img(Visited 338 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 This entry continues listed examples of political bias in science, academia and secular media.Last week, we illustrated the disease of misconduct and unreliability in Big Science. And yet Big Science and Big Media continue their onslaught against Christian values, conservative politics, and Donald Trump. Here’s a rapid-fire list to prove it; these titanic conglomerates are juggernauts of leftism, not pure-hearted seekers of truth. They stray far outside their domain of natural knowledge into politics, ethics, and philosophy. Can anyone find any article in the major journals or secular science media that support conservative views? The following examples are not 100% wrong in everything they say, but they display an overwhelming bias against conservative ideas and a strong undertone of leftist ideas. There is one article supporting religious values in the list. See if you can find it.(Note: Articles from amalgamating news sites like Science Daily and Phys.org come originally from universities, labs and other academic science institutions.)Homosexuality: You can tell where Clayton Howard is headed with his headline on The Conversation: “The migration of same-sex couples to the suburbs is shaping the fight for LGBT equality.” First of all, is it science’s job to get involved in this “fight”? Second, define LGBT equality; they already get special treatment! The ones needing equality are those trying to defend their religious beliefs about marriage and gender.Guns and Health: PLoS Biology wants to get “science in the fight to uphold the rights of children.” About 80% of the goals of this paper are noble and uncontroversial (nutrition, vaccines, health care) but science is supposed to stick to natural knowledge, not fights and advocacy. Read further and you find the article includes oblique attacks on gun ownership, and expects governments to be the solution to everything. Those are leftist positions.Criminality: This article on Science Daily upholds the materialist view that criminals are products of their neurobiology, not sinners. By implication, treatment is a subject for neuroscience, not criminal justice. Another piece on Medical Xpress tries to explain altruism in psychological terms. Psychological science, you recall from previous CEH reports, is under scrutiny for non-reproducible results. Religious upbringing leads to better health and well-being in adults, Medical Xpress says. But Science Daily talks about the “evolution of psychiatric disorders,” making criminal behavior a matter of Darwinism, not personal responsibility.Gender confusion: There’s a new word for normal people: “cisgender” (as opposed to “transgender”). These are people who identify with their biological sex.  In her “Explainer” at The Conversation, Joanna McIntyre decides the word is divisive, because it implies there are only two genders.Health care: This article on Medical Xpress about the opioid epidemic suggests that the problem derives partly from health care policies in the “era of Donald Trump.” Trump is not the cause of “deaths of despair in the era of Donald Trump,” conservatives would respond; he is working hard to solve it, but don’t expect secular media to give him any credit.Gender confusion: Medical Xpress notes that LGBT people have “poorer health outcomes” than normal people, but what’s the solution? Not to help them change, of course. The leftist position is to force insurance companies to take care of them.Abortion: This is an attack by New Scientist on the Trump administration and his nomination of Judge Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. This leftist “science” rag is that they “might” limit the ability of women to kill their children, and also might limit “fetal research” – the sale of baby body parts. What a horror that would be!Homosexuality: Phys.org praises the teachers whose attitudes are becoming more accepting of LGBT students, in contrast to those nasty religious “fundamentalists” who “view homosexuality much more negatively than those with more progressive religious views.”Climate change: Rachel Nagelberg (Northwestern U) begins positively on Phys.org, suggesting there is “a bright side to those dire climate change reports.” And what could that be, Rachel? She grins, it’s the election of a bunch of new progressive Democrats in Congress that can stop Trump. “We’re going to need some pretty radical thinking and radical change,” she concludes. Science Daily rings the alarm, “Nations must triple efforts” to reach the U.N. climate goals – this despite the revelations of new natural sources of the potent greenhouse gas methane we reported (28 Nov 2018) that were not figured into their climate models.Corporal punishment: Medical Xpress concludes from a study of pediatricians that spanking is never right. But did the secular eggheads at Tufts University ask Dr. James Dobson? Did they ask Solomon? Are today’s scientists the only ones who have learned how to raise successful children with appropriate discipline? Parents have been having children since Adam and Eve, and quite a few turned out OK that were spanked. Some spanking can be abusive, but not all of it, if done sparingly and in love, Christians believe. Should science decide questions of right and wrong?Abortion: This piece on Medical Xpress is fairly balanced, but you see the bias in the headline: “the right to abortion is on the line.”Political bias: Nature writes, “Beware the rise of the radical right.” Is there no radical left? Surely there is, and it is dangerous. “Academic freedom is on the hit list when radical politicians gain office — as they have done in Europe,” the Editors say. Oh, my goodness. What we could say about academic freedom in the Soviet Union, North Korea, and Cuba. Nature is blind to that, although they do qualify it somewhat, with no examples, “When parties of either the extreme right or extreme left take power, any one of democracy’s foundational pillars can be knocked away.” Their bogeymen are Brexits, patriots, and ones who don’t believe in man-caused global warming. Their utopia is “collective progressivism” (globalism).Advocacy: Nature advocates for advocacy: “Why graduate students should get involved in advocacy.” Advocacy for what, you ask? The usual leftist progressive stuff: diversity and inclusion, government funding, climate activism, etc. This helps grad students become “leaders.” Aren’t scientists supposed to be neutral, dispassionate, disinterested researchers about natural phenomena?Conclusion: Understanding “the myth of apolitical science” (Science). Are you surprised at learning about all this bias within academia? You shouldn’t be. In a book review of Freedom’s Laboratory: The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science by historian Audra J. Wolfe, reviewer Alex Wollerstein says that politics and science have a long history.“Science is apolitical” is a deeply political statement: One only feels the need to assert something like this in times when it is a hard case to make. That science exists within a political environment and participates in political activities should not be controversial. But it is, especially in the current moment, when it would be (politically) convenient to have something in our present world that felt devoid of politics.At times in the past, science leaned conservative. Now, it is overwhelmingly liberal. One reason for that is the extremely lopsided party affiliation in universities, especially in the sciences. Jerry Bergman shows how out of touch scientists are with the American public:In an examination of over 150 departments and upper-level administrations at 32 elite colleges, the Center for the Study of Popular Culture found that the ratio of registered Democrats to registered Republicans was more than 10 to 1 (1,397 Democrats compared to 134 Republicans). In the US, registered Democrats and Republicans are roughly equal in number, but not a single department at any of the 32 schools even remotely approaches parity between the two.The closest any school came was Northwestern University, where 80 percent of faculty were registered Democrats and 20 percent registered Republicans. At Brown University the ratio was 30 to 1. The researchers could not identify a single Republican on the faculty at Williams, Oberlin, MIT, or Haverford Colleges. The ratio of liberal to conservative professors has profoundly changed from 4 to 1 a few years ago to 17 to 1 today. A Center of Media and Public Affairs Study found that “American academia is overwhelmingly dominated by liberal secularists,” a fact that proves bias against conservatives and religious persons in hiring and promotion of faculty. According to Gallop Polls of the last 50 years, about 70 percent of Americans believe in some form of creationism in contrast to about 3 percent of leading science academics. Depending on how questions are asked, around 10 percent of American are atheists compared to 95 percent of leading science academics.With such a total imbalance in party affiliation and religious belief, we cannot expect their scientific research to be immune from political views. Perhaps the only quick solution would be a program of affirmative action for conservatives, with funding tied to the degree of parity on faculty.Not all these articles are 100% biased. Some say good things. Some report facts apparently with neutrality. Pervading them, though, you hear a leftist-progressive undertone, sometimes loud, sometimes soft. It’s everywhere, like a background buzz. You almost never hear a conservative refrain in the din. Why do you never hear reports like “Blacks make up 13.4% of the population, but 36% of abortions” except on conservative sites like CNS News? Why do only conservative news sites like Breitbart News talk about the human rights abuses in North Korea that have gotten worse since Kim Jong-un took power?Science doesn’t have to be that way. There is absolutely no reason for a leftist slant in science. Many of the founders of science were highly religious or conservative politically, and did great work. Those who are conservative today often have to keep quiet, lest the PC police end their careers.Note, please, that this commentary is not overturning the tables. It’s about balance. The situation would be just as bad if conservatives controlled Big Science and Big Media and persecuted its dissenters. Scientists should be free to vote Democrat if they want to, and believe in liberal views unrelated to their scientific work. But in the same way, conservatives should be allowed to work as scientists in a university or lab without fear of being shunned or dismissed, and reporters should be allowed to write about research that supports traditional values. Debate is essential for good science. The news is distorted without a conservative voice.The bias in science and media is a great evil that must be rectified. Most academics, studies have shown are Democrats who voted for Clinton and despise Trump. Some departments at universities are 100% Democrat, or even radical socialist. You know this is going to infect their research. The same bias pervades media, and it odorizes their reporting.The solution is balance. So let’s use a progressive tactic against the leftists: advocate for affirmative action for conservative scientists and reporters, until 50/50 parity is reached. Who would complain about that, except a totalitarian?last_img read more

Limpopo gets R7.4bn water project

first_img28 May 2008The government has signed a memorandum of agreement with 23 mining companies to jointly invest R7.4-billion in the Olifants River water project, which aims to unlock mining opportunities and increase water provision in the Limpopo province.Addressing delegates at the signing of the agreement in Johannesburg this week, Water Affairs and Forestry Minister Lindiwe Hendricks said the projects were to ensure an increased capacity in the country’s water resources and alleviate concerns that water was running out.She warned, however, that much greater priority needed to be given to water conservation and water demand management that as South Africa was a water scarce country and only a limited number of dams could be built.“We have a joint responsibility to manage our natural resources in a sustainable manner for our future generations and protect them,” she said in a department statement.“Water, offers us life, it brings with it possibilities of social development and economic opportunities.”Human developmentThe major component of the Olifants River water project is the De Hoop Dam, which will firstly store floodwater for bulk supply to residential and commercial users as well as poorly serviced rural communities in the Limpopo province, and secondly to supply the platinum group metals mines in the area.Hendricks said the memorandum paved the way for the development of these mines, due to conclusion of water supply agreements, and the addressing of key risks through ensuring suitable project design and appropriate financing instruments.“The mutual benefits of bringing private sector finance into these projects allows us to concentrate the public sector resources on investment in human development and in overcoming enormous inequalities in the provision of basic services such as water, sanitation and waste management,” Hendricks said.Work on the De Hoop Dam started in July this year and the dam is scheduled to start delivering water to industrial, commercial and residential users by April 2011.“The project will bring a number of business and job opportunities, with related skills training opportunities during the construction period,” she said.Broad benefitsApart from the direct permanent employment opportunities that will be created by the project, it has been estimated that mining and its support industries will stimulate investment of several billion rand and create hundreds of jobs.The mining companies operating locally have also invested millions on the Lebalelo water pipeline, which runs from the Olifants River to the Steelpoort area and further southwards to the Mototolo mine, to ensure increased water provision for mining activities.In addition, the mining companies have also invested over R200-million into raising the Flag Boshielo Dam in exchange for an increased assured supply of water, further highlighting the growing cooperation between the government and the private sector.The water affairs department is also working with state-owned power utility Eskom to investigate the possibility of constructing a new pumped storage scheme to provide an additional 1 500 megawatts to the national grid and provide potable water to about 800 000 people in the Nebo Plateau in Sekhukhune.SAinfo reporter Would you like to use this article in your publicationor on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Using a Glycol Ground Loop to Condition Ventilation Air

first_imgMost energy-efficient homes include a mechanical ventilation system — often an HRV or ERV that brings in fresh outdoor air while simultaneously exhausting an equal volume of stale indoor air. The main problem with introducing outdoor air into a house is that the air is at the wrong temperature — too cold during the winter and too hot (and often too humid) during the summer.HRVs and ERVs address this problem by passing the outdoor air through a heat-exchange core designed to take the edge off extreme temperatures. (For more information on this type of ventilation system, see HRV or ERV?) While the tempering function of the heat-exchange core helps, it isn’t a perfect solution. Unless the outdoor air is already at room temperature, the air delivered by an HRV or an ERV will always be cool in the winter and warm in the summer. Moreover, in cold conditions an HRV core starts accumulating ice. Manufacturers have developed a variety of solutions to the frost problem. For example, a cold HRV core can be warmed by temporarily closing the outdoor air damper and circulating indoor air through the core (that is, by putting the HRV into “recirculation” or “exhaust only” mode). Another way to address ice buildup is to include an electric resistance heater that raises the temperature of the incoming outdoor air.Some HRV and ERV manufacturers (including Zehnder and Ultimate Air) offer a third option: a system which conditions incoming outdoor air by blowing it through copper heat-exchange coils connected to a buried ground loop. This buried ground loop consists of hundreds of feet of PEX tubing (usually between 3/4 inch and 1 1/4 inch in diameter) filled with a glycol solution; operation of the system requires a pump to circulate the… Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberscenter_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log inlast_img read more

ONGC charts course for new avatar targets 1516 bn investment

first_imgNew Delhi: India’s top oil and gas producer ONGC on Friday unveiled a $15-16 billion investment plan to double output from its domestic and overseas fields, expand its refining capacity three folds and diversify into renewables to earn four times higher net profit by 2040. Oil and Natural Gas Corp (ONGC), which has seen crude oil production stagnate as a majority of its prime fields are ageing and are past their prime, has adopted a new ‘Energy Strategy 2040’, company Chairman and Managing Director Shashi Shanker told reporters here. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalThe company, which started with an equity infusion of Rs 343 crore by the government more than six decades back, has generated a wealth of over Rs 9 lakh crore since then and is now venturing on a new road to further enhance value. It has already seen a turnaround in natural gas with output rising for the fourth successive year to 24.75 billion cubic meters and is further slated to go up to 32 bcm by FY24, he said. “We see gas production rising to 40 bcm by 2040,” he said. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostThe new Energy Strategy 2040, which was adopted by the board a few weeks back, sets target of “three-time revenue distributed across exploration and production (E&P), refining and marketing; 4 times current PAT with 10 per cent contribution from non-oil and gas business; and 5-6 times current market capitalisation,” he said. ONGC, he said, will still remain strongly invested in oil and gas but it also looks beyond hydrocarbons. “The new strategy document aims to transform ONGC in a new ‘avatar’ in this new energy landscape as a diversified energy company with a strong contribution from non-E&P businesses,” he said. The firm produced 24.23 million tonnes of crude oil in the 2018-19 fiscal year and 25.81 billion cubic metres of natural gas from its domestic fields. Another 10.1 million tonnes of oil and 4.736 bcm of gas was produced from its overseas assets. It had a turnover of Rs 1,09,654 crore and a net profit of Rs 26,715 crore in the year ended March 31, 2019. It has a market capitalisation of Rs 1.55 lakh crore as on date. “Our fields are old and ageing, 30-50 years old and have reached a plateau. So we are investing in re-development projects to arrest the fall and extend the life,” he said. The company is investing around Rs 86,000 crore in 27 major projects to boost oil and gas production, which has stagnated over the last few years. These projects will yield 76 million tonnes of oil and 121 bcm of gas. The overall plan, which includes overseas projects, expanding refining capacity and investing in renewables, will entail $15-16 billion investment.last_img read more

Feds announce funding for Churchill Man as rail dispute continues

first_imgCHURCHILL, Man. – The federal government has announced millions of dollars in economic diversification and research money for a northern Manitoba town that lost its rail service this year.Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr says the money will be used to help create jobs in Churchill, which is dealing with higher shipping costs and a drop in the vital tourism industry.The town of 900 people on Hudson Bay lost its only land connection to the south last spring, when railway owner Omnitrax announced it would not repair severe flood damage to the region’s rail line.Since then, goods and people have had to be flown in at much higher cost.The federal government has filed a lawsuit against Omnitrax and is trying to help transfer ownership of the rail line to a consortium of northern Manitoba communities.Carr says progress on that front is being made, and everyone is anxious to see the rail line under new ownership and fixed.“Certainly we’re very hopeful that this will be completed in time for the transportation season,” Carr said in an interview Friday.Churchill Mayor Mike Spence said he was glad to hear about the federal funding, which will be used for projects ranging from fresh-food gardens to new research jobs at the Churchill Marine Observatory.“It’s additional funding so that we can go through a very challenging and difficult time that we have here.”Spence said the main focus is on restoring rail service and he hopes a deal will be reached, although he would not go into detail.“We have a target that we need to meet and we’re moving along,” he said.“There’s certain things that need to be done. You know, we’re hoping to sit across the table — so to speak — shortly after the new year sometime.”— by Steve Lambert in Winnipeglast_img read more

Investigation launched into alleged harassment of Inuk soldier

first_imgAPTN National NewsIt’s been an intense few weeks for Cpl. Esther Wolki.Wolki is the Inuk soldier APTN first reported faced years of abuse in the armed forces.APTN’s Dennis Ward reports an investigation has been launched into her allegations.last_img

Ohio State mens hockey splits weekend series with Michigan State

Sophomore defenseman Drew Brevig (4) and senior forward Chad Niddery (19) line up for a faceoff during a game against Michigan State on Nov. 21 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 3-0. Credit: Kelly Roderick / For The LanternThe Ohio State men’s hockey team played a desperate brand of hockey for the entirety of its game against Michigan State on Friday night. The effort was much needed as the Buckeyes (4-7-1, 1-1-0) had dropped four of their past five games before their 3-0 win against the Spartans in Columbus.“I thought we worked hard again tonight,” OSU coach Steve Rohlik said. “I tip my cap to our guys … we challenged them to get a little bit better and I think (they) did that as a team.”Pace was the difference maker in the Buckeyes’ second conference game of the season as they hounded the Spartans (4-7-0, 1-1-0) for the first two periods, holding a 20-18 shot advantage through 40 minutes. OSU then preserved its lead during the third.After failing to capitalize on second-chance opportunities in a 2-1 loss to Michigan State on Thursday, OSU opened the first period of Friday’s game with an increased offensive zone pressure and attempts on Spartans’ junior goaltender Jake Hildebrand.The difference in gameplay was noticeable within the first 10 seconds of the game when Buckeye senior forward Nick Oddo won the opening face off and directed the puck on Hildebrand to create an early net scramble.OSU found its scoring mojo in the second period after a delayed goal call gave senior forward Matt Johnson his third goal of the season and put the Buckeyes ahead, 1-0.The on-ice officials didn’t originally see the puck enter the net, but the referees reviewed the play during the next stoppage and indicated the puck had crossed the goal line.Johnson’s goal was counted a minute after he scored and was a product of the NCAA’s offseason rule changes that allow officials to determine the legitimacy of goals on plays that preceded the last whistle.OSU used its momentum from Johnson’s goal on the man-advantage five minutes later when sophomore forward Nick Schilkey redirected a shot from the blue line past Hildebrand for the team’s second goal.“It’s something that’s certainly a focal point for us,” Rohlik said of the power play. “At the end of the night, again, special teams are the key.”The Buckeyes continued to dictate the pace of the game when senior forward Darik Angeli made it 3-0 after an odd-man rush at the 3:14 mark of the third period.OSU sophomore goalie Matt Tomkins helped prevent the Spartans’ pushback, making 29 saves en route to his first collegiate shutout.“My focus was just to keep the guys in the game and make those big saves when I had to,” Tomkins said. “They played excellent in front of me.”The Spartans finished zero-for-three on the man advantage and were unable to capitalize on three power plays in the third period.“We did a lot of good things,” Johnson said of the Buckeyes’ penalty kill. “We got in lanes and did a pretty good job of pushing them down, holding them in the corners and taking away a lot of shooting lanes.”OSU is next set to play Western Michigan in the Shillelagh Tournament in South Bend, Ind., on Friday. read more

Emilia Clarke: Next ‘Game of Thrones’ Fight Will Be Bigger Than Winterfell

first_imgStay on target ‘Game of Thrones’ Targaryen Prequel Series Is Reportedly Coming to HBO‘Game of Thrones’ Star Kit Harington Joins Marvel’s &#… Game of Thrones’ last season is in full swing, and the “Battle of Winterfell” left many fans in shock, as they watched a long fight between Iron Throne contenders and White Walkers. But, the power struggle is not over yet: According to Emilia Clarke, one of the last episodes will be bigger than Season 8, Episode 3’s deadly showdown.On Wednesday night, Clarke spoke with Jimmy Kimmel on Jimmy Kimmel Live! about filming the final season of Game of Thrones and what audiences might expect for the last three episodes.“Episode five is bigger,” Clarke told Kimmel. “Episode five is—I mean, four and five and six, they’re all insane, but like…find the biggest TV you can.”It’s likely that Episode 4 could be a transition episode, where the surviving heroes will form a plan of attack against Euron Greyjoy and Cersei Lannister, who are building up the ultimate fleet, as shown in the Game of Thrones Season 8, Episode 4 preview trailer. From what Clarke said though, fans might need to prepare themselves for what’s to come on Episode 5 and Episode 6.The “Battle of Winterfell” wasn’t a typical TV fight though: Season 8, Episode 3 required 55 nights of shooting and 750 people, according to Clarke. The episode, which featured multiple fight scenes between many characters and the Night King’s death, was the longest battle sequence created in TV history, Vox reported.Even though Season 8, Episode 5 is two weeks away, Clarke is making everyone stay on the edge of their seats for now. In the meantime, Season 8, Episode 4 could give fans a better understanding of how some of Westeros plans to take down Cersei Lannister, who will be the “last war” following the “Battle of Winterfell” aftermath.Game of Thrones Season 8, Episode 4 will premiere on Sunday, May 5 at 9 p.m. EST on HBO.<em><strong>More on Geek.com:</strong></em>&nbsp;</p><p>More on Geek.com:First Look: ‘Game of Thrones’ Season 8, Episode 4 Photos ‘Game of Thrones’ Season 8, Episode 4 Preview: One Last War to Win‘Game of Thrones’ Stars Say Goodbye to ‘Battle of Winterfell’ Fallen Heroeslast_img read more

California Wants to Limit Storage of Smart Speaker Recordings

first_img California lawmakers introduced a bill that would limit how manufacturers of smart speakers and digital assistants collect recordings.The Anti-Eavesdropping Act, which cleared its first committee this week, prohibits saving, storing, or sharing of audio recordings without explicit consent from the user.“Recent revelations about how certain companies have staff that listen in to private conversations via connected smart speakers further shows why this bill is necessary to protect privacy in the home,” Assemblyman Jordan Cunningham (R-San Luis Obispo), the bill’s author, said in a statement published by The Mercury News.Bloomberg last month shocked no one with the news that thousands of Amazon employees around the world listen in on Echo owners’ conversations (allegedly to improve the technology).More troubling is the fact that workers can also access location information of Alexa users and look up their home or office address.The California bill—introduced in February by Cunningham—defines “smart speaker devices” as a wireless speaker and voice command device with an integrated virtual assistant “that offers interactive actions and hands-free activation.”Should the legislation pass, it would severely handicap services like Amazon’s Alexa, Siri from Apple, and Google Assistant (among a handful of others).“We’re monitoring this developing legislation,” a Google spokeswoman told Geek in an emailed statement. “That said, we believe that the combination of strong and balanced regulations, with products that are designed with privacy in mind, will help provide individuals with confidence that they’re in control of their personal information.”As Digital Trends pointed out, California is not the first state to try to limit digital eavesdropping: Illinois previously attempted to pass a similar law, which Google and Amazon lobbied against.More on Geek.com:Stop Ignoring Your Smart Speaker’s Privacy FunctionsUK Gov’t Uses Alexa, Google Assistant to Dispense InfoAmazon Accidentally Sent 1,700 Alexa Recordings to a Random Person9 Times Your Smart Speaker Got WeirdEditor’s note: This article was updated on May 7 with comment from Google. Easily Assign Tasks With Google AssistantGoogle Defends Letting Humans Listen to Virtual Assistant Queries Stay on targetlast_img read more

‘Mortal Kombat 11’ Kharacter Guide: Kitana

first_imgWho Are They?Kitana is the good and fair Princess of Edenia. Or rather she was until the fantasy realm was violently conquered by the villainous forces of Outworld. She then spent much of her life as the unwittingly “adopted” desert assassin daughter of the brutal emperor Shao Kahn, where her DNA was even stolen to create a monster clone “sister” Mileena. But Outworld’s struggle against Earthrealm in Mortal Kombat gives Kitana an opportunity for revenge against her “father.”Kombat KhronologyKitana was one of the major new characters in Mortal Kombat 2, giving the game more female representation beyond just Sonya Blade. And since then she’s remained one of the game’s most prominent female characters, the mold other fantasy women characters diverge from. She’s also become a bit of a love interest for Liu Kang in later games, with Mortal Kombat 11 especially playing up their bond both in the past and in the present as evil zombies.Koolest KustomizationsKitana’s face gets one of the better upgrades thanks to Mortal Kombat 11 now rendering the characters more like real people. So I go with her human form versus her rotting corpse form. As for moves, Kitana’s main gimmick is slicing foes with razor sharp fan blades. So I go for death by a thousand cuts with moves that increase how many fans I can throw out at once or summon around myself for a protective barrier.How Gross Is The Fatality?Kitana’s regal grace doesn’t make her fatality any less gruesome. She just doesn’t get her own hands dirty. Instead, she cut you open and uses her fans to summon a tornado that pulls your entrails out like a gory force of nature. Takes my breath (and everything else) away. Mortal Kombat 11 is available now for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC, and Nintendo Switch. For more, read our spine-ripping impressions of the game as a whole, learn more about Mortal Kombat’s history with the government, and check out our character guide for the much less violent fighting game Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.View as: One Page Slides1/271. Read Our Full Mortal Kombat 11 ReviewRead Johnny Cage’s Guide2. Read Sub-Zero’s Guide3. Read Erron Black’s Guide4. Read Scorpion’s Guide5. Read Liu Kang’s Guide6. Read Raiden Guide7. Read Kitana’s Guide8. Read Kung Lao’s Guide9. Read Cetrion’s Guide10. Read Jade’s Guide11. Read Kotal Kahn’s Guide12. Read Skarlet’s Guide13. Read Noob Saibot’s Guide14. Read Geras’ Guide15. Read Baraka’s Guide16. Read Jax’s Guide17. Read Jacqui Briggs’ Guide18. Read Frost’s Guide19. Read D’Vorah’s Guide20. Read Kabal’s Guide21. Read Kano’s Guide22. Read Cassie Cage’s Guide23. Read Shao Kahn’s Guide24. Read Kollector’s Guide25. Read Sonya Blade’s Guide26. Read Shang Tsung’s Guide27. Read Nightwolf’s Guide Stay on target There have been eleven main Mortal Kombat games. Can you believe it? The 90s were that long ago. Since then the fighting game has become a gory institution as colorful ninjas and sorcerers and special forces agents collide to rip each others’ guts out in wacky martial arts tournaments.But in the past decade Mortal Kombat has gone from just a recognizable violent fighting game to a really good recognizable violent fighting game. And the recently released Mortal Kombat 11 brings the reboot trilogy home with a story mode stretching across all of history and new ways for customizing characters to your liking, with different skills and gear to make the accessible mechanics even more varied and deep.Expensive cutscenes and ancillary (arguably exploitative) side content aren’t worth anything though if your fighting game doesn’t have a solid roster. Fortunately, Mortal Kombat 11 gives you a diverse cast of kombatants on which to unleash your bloodlust. And we’re taking a look at every single one of them. Today’s fighter: Kitana. Joker and The Terminator Cross Over Into ‘Mortal Kombat 11’‘Mortal Kombat 11’ Kharacter Guide: Nightwolf last_img read more