The big fight

first_imgThe big fightOn 21 Jan 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article LuciaGraves takes a look at bullying in a global context, and asks what is it, howdoes it impact on your business, and what policy decisions can you take toavoid it?Bullying in the workplace costs businesses hundreds of billions of pounds ayear with at least one in 10 employees reporting being bullied at some timeduring their working life. In recent surveys carried out in the UK, the US,Australia, and European Union, the percentage of people who had been bullied inthe workforce ranged from 8 to 20 per cent – and this is without looking atparts of the world where employee protection and health and safety regulationsare much less developed. A study of 3,500 UK workers by Mercer Human Resource Consulting found morethan one in five had been bullied at work at least once during the past year.Almost one in 10 reported bullying on more than one occasion, with 2 per centsaying they have been bullied five or six times. The TUC reported last year that the most recent figures available showedthat 1.3 million people had been attacked at work in the UK during one year. Inthe US workplace, there are two million violent victimisations a year, includingassaults, rapes and robberies; and an average of 1,000 workplace murders ayear, according to The National Crime Victimisation Survey in the early 1990s,the most recent figures available. In Australia estimates on ‘harassment’ in the workplace range from 400,000to two million workers affected each year, affecting between up to five millionworkers at some point during their working lives (Beyond Bullying Association2001). There are similar figures for Europe – about 8 per cent of EU workers(or 12 million workers) have been bullied, according to a European Union surveyin 1996. Bullying is a more common problem, then, than illegal discrimination such asracist or sexist behaviour and affects both sexes. The US Campaign AgainstWorkplace Bullying (CAWB) survey in 2000 found both men and women guilty ofbullying, with women making up three-quarters of the targets. More than 80 percent of bullies are bosses. It is a matter of concern because of the severe effects it has on employees.The CAWB found 41 per cent of bullying victims were diagnosed with depression.And one in five men and one in three women suffered from post-traumatic stressdisorder. Quite apart from the personal human misery implied from these figures, italso costs businesses money. More than 80 per cent of respondents to the CAWBreported effects preventing them being productive at work through anxiety andsleeplessness. And 80 per cent left their jobs – half through choice. So theresult of bullying for employers is underperforming staff or losing staff –both expensive options. In the worst cases, the business may end up being sued. One of the highestcompensation payouts for bullying at work in the UK reached £230,000. Thehighest recent settlement in the US was $3m (£1.9m) – although this was laterreduced to $300,000 (£187,000) by a federal court. The total cost can be huge. A survey carried out by the Australiangovernment estimates the cost of bullying to be $Aus 6-7bn (£2.2bn to 2.5bn) ayear or 0.9 per cent to 2 per cent of GDP. A serious case over six monthsbetween Aus$17,000 and Aus$24,000, (£6,000-£9,000) or anything up toAus$175,000 (£64,000) a case (including everything from legal and settlementcosts and estimated costs of operating in the meantime minus that worker). Inthe UK the estimated cost is £2bn a year, according to a report by the LondonChamber of Commerce. The movement against bullying in the workplace is now gathering momentum.One of the countries at the forefront is Sweden, which has had anti-bullying legislationsince 1993 – the ordinance of the Swedish National Board of Occupational Safetyand Health contained provisions for measures against Victimisation at Work. AndAustralia completed a huge study of workplace violence in March 2002, theQueensland Government Workplace Bullying Taskforce Report. All over the world Bills are being drafted against bullying: the Dignity atWork Bill in the UK, which failed to pass through parliament before the summerbreak in 2002, but could be revived; the US Campaign against Bullying isplanning to lobby for state legislation in California then Colorado and otherUS states; and the European Union commissioned research into violence in theworkplace which was completed in 2001 – a first step towards legislation. There are vocal pressure groups in most countries, too, such the CAWB run byGary Namie in the US. “We need to make it legally actionable,” hesays. “At the moment in the US, for example, a woman can’t sue anotherwoman for bullying. She can only sue if it is sexual harassment.” What is bullying in the workplace? Headache number one for HR departments is that bullying is defineddifferently in different parts of the world. Where there is no legislationspecifically about bullying, anti-discrimination legislation or human rightslegislation can be used to bring legal cases against an employer. The problem with not defining it is that one man’s bully can be another’s‘robust’ manager, with a tough style that could, even unintentionally, distressemployees. A general definition is that bullying is a form of psychological orphysical harassment. In Australia, the Queensland Government Workplace Bullying Taskforceredefined bullying as ‘workplace harassment’ in its report published in March2002, because harassment had already been recognised as ‘prohibited conduct’.The definition runs: “Workplace harassment is repeated behaviour other than behaviour thatis sexual harassment, that: – Is directed at an individual worker or group of workers, and – Is offensive, intimidating, humiliating or threatening, and – Is unwelcome and unsolicited, and – A reasonable person would consider to be offensive, intimidating orthreatening for the individual worker or group of workers.” Has bullying increased? Bullying is a growing problem because of new workplace stresses. JaneCarrington, managing director of Right CoreCare, a company that runs EmployeeAssistance Programmes in the UK, (see p20) suggests: “There may be moreemphasis now on performance, with the personnel department which [previously]dealt with employee welfare and supporting the employee, looking at theirwellbeing, becoming human resources which looks at recruitment, retention andperformance. But you have a lot of people frightened of change.” The cultural factor Not all cultures recognise bullying as a problem, although problems canarise when two cultures clash. Zareen Karani Araoz, president of the US-basedconsultancy Managing Across Cultures, has studied workers in countries asdiverse as Japan and India, and their working relationship with Westernemployees. “Cross-cultural training needs to be compulsory for any multinationalexecutive dealing with other cultures, and also for workers moving into newcultures,” she says. “Indians in the US, for example, sometimes allowthemselves to be bullied.” She explained that this is because salaries arelower, and they are working in some marginalised part of the company and feelthey can’t say anything. “They can’t be productive in these circumstances.They can be very timid, and need to be taught how to be more culturallyappropriate.” India has a different concept of bullying according to Araoz.”Behaviour such as raising your voice is not interpreted in the same wayas in America. In many family-run businesses the head is seen as a benevolentdictator who tells you what you should be doing – although this would have beentolerated more in the past than today.” As a result of this and othersocio-economic factors, bullying litigation is non-existent. In Japan, where there is a strong corporate hierarchy similar to India’s,complications can arise when dealing with Westerners. The Japanese have a greatsense of saving face and pride, are unable to express their feelings and areultra sensitive to domination, but they don’t show it in a way Westernersunderstand. “There are nine ways of saying ‘yes’ in Japanese, and seven of saying‘no’. When they perceive they are being bullied they may seem to say yes and donothing,” explains Araoz. “The Japanese mindset is attuned tocourtesy and sensibility, so the way Americans speak can be perceived asdominating, ordering, or bullying.” What policy decisions to make “Many companies don’t want to know about the problem. They are toofrightened,” says anti-bullying writer Tim Field, author of UK website www.successunlimited.co.uk.”They have to recognise signs of dysfunction. It is a serial offence inthe majority of cases I process, and the bully is often very convincing.” Bullying is particularly difficult for HR departments to deal with becauseit is an issue between employees and requires care so as not to assume guilt oneither side – as well as avoiding being more sympathetic to the ‘victim’because the complaint is not always justified. Ann Coles, consultant at employment law specialist Fox Williams, says:”It is very difficult for HR departments to deal with because it is as ifboth sides are on trial. The ‘victim’ may be suffering from stress but theperson who is accused will also find it a harrowing experience. There ispotential for an employer to lose both sets of employees. You have to be fair,neutral and independent.” She adds: “It has an enormous cost to the reputation of both victim andperpetrator – people may lose their jobs. I’ve seen instances where the personaccused was not guilty, the accusation was a means of getting rid of someonewho was a threat. In ambitious companies accusing people of bullying may be atactic.” There are two main strategies a company can follow to pre-empt bullying inthe workplace: draw up a bullying policy and train their employees inappropriate action and in teambuilding, or hire a company to start up anEmployer Assistance Programme. “A written policy is essential, it makes clear what acceptablestandards are,” says Field. “It gives the employer the aegis to dealwith the issue in the absence of a legal statement. It has to be more thanwords on paper, with a willingness to carry it through.” Ann Bevitt, partner and employment law specialist at Morrison &Foerster, agrees. “It is essential to have a policy in place so employeesknow what they should and should not be doing. If companies have someprecautions, and have taken all reasonable steps to stop something, they can’tbe found liable in the UK” Namie’s campaign against workplace bullying in the US emphasises the need toinvolve all stakeholders in policy drafting – from employees to HR department,union reps and management. Training programmes Training programmes that encourage teambuilding could offer a way ofavoiding bullying. Rhoda Frindell Green, a New York City-based organisationalpsychologist and consultant to companies on HR issues, uses the Myers BriggsType Indicator questionnaire, which measures personal preferences and differentwork styles. She then gets team members to discuss the results, and uses it toshow why people who have different ways of working can be equally effective. “It shows there is another way to work. This person can make acontribution,” explains Green. Namie, who has also worked on anti-bullying policies and training, believesthis is essential – “otherwise employers tend to make the target solve hisor her own problem” he says. “In domestic violence it is considered illegal and immoral so weoutlawed it, but with bullying this has not happened.” But, he adds, thecompany’s willingness to stamp out the bully is limited. “It says: ‘do youmean our regional manager Bob would be affected if he was a repeat offender?’It doesn’t want to let go of its right to veto whatever the company has decidedis best.” Employee Assistance Programmes Designed to create a lifeline for distressed employees, the EmployeeAssistance Programmes offer access to an impartial third party for anonymouscounselling and assistance. Companies which run EAPs should be fully informedabout any policy the particular company has taken towards bullying andoccupational health. Jane Carrington, managing director of Right CoreCare whichruns EAPs for several companies in the UK, points out that bullying can be aquestion of perception, esteem, or the way the company is being run or changed.She says an important aspect of the work is that it preserves employeeanonymity. “Only if the individual agrees can we reveal their identity. We workwith them to rebuild strategies to go back into work.” The advantage of having an outsider is that they do not have the sameloyalties as someone within a company, and the employee is more likely to discussproblems when confidentiality is guaranteed before getting to crisis point. “It is also advantageous to the company as the procedures will thenseem fairer to all sides, and it has an informed monitor on its personnel.Carrington says: “If you get a lot of calls for the same problems to dowith the same manager we would highlight that to the personnel manager. Againwe have to make sure it is a trend.” Another good reason to set up an EAP is that in the UK ~Judge Lady JusticeHale recently ruled that an EAP might constitute a legal defence for a companyaccused of allowing bullying. Not everyone is sure that an EAP is enough, however. Anti-bullying authorField says: “In theory it is a good idea, but it depends on the attitudesof employers. Some use it as a cover and do it for good PR. It needs to comefrom a genuine desire to produce a healthy, happy employee.” Beyond the EAP Coles says that a company may need to go beyond written policy and EAPs tochange the company culture. “It needs to be proactive and have management training dealing withmacho management culture, to be firm on this and make it clear this is notacceptable. It must also give illustrations of what this culture looks like.This way it can get in before their managers turn into ‘bullies’.” Carrington stresses that any anti-bullying policy needs to go to the heartof the organisation’s culture. “The culture is important, it should bepeople-centred and ethical, and people want opportunities to be creative,”she says. Bullying: the steps employees should take– The first stage in any bullyingproblem should be the ‘victim’ trying to sort the problem out with theperpetrator, before taking it to a complaint stage, says Dr Rhoda FrindellGreen, a New York City-based organisational psychologist and consultant tocompanies on HR issues. She has often given advice to employees about how todeal with problems, and she divides bullying issues into three categories –when the bully is:1) Boss/clientIf you are the target you need to go to the other person andask for some time to talk – say, half an hour. You call the meeting and youropening statement should be something such as “Here is what I need, to dothe best possible job for you. I could do a better job for you if I get ‘X’from you. I need to get to do this or that in a meeting, and need you not tosent me those biting e-mails, or I need you to call me and give me thisinformation because I feel isolated”. This is a way of getting thingsstraightened out. Let’s assume the boss says “Yes, fine, I didn’t realiseI was doing this, I apologise”. If a week later the boss is still doingthe same thing, you go back in and say in a more light-hearted way, “Uhoh, its happening again”, giving them another chance to change it. Thissometimes changes the relationship and the bullying stops.The employee has choices. He or she can discuss it the problemwith management, but first should try to negotiate. In the worst case they canrequest a transfer or resign. 2) Staff member who reports to you/outside vendorYou call them in and say: “This is not acceptablebehaviour, this is a warning.” If it is a staff member you say: “Ifthis continues you risk losing your job”, witha vendor “If thiscontinues you risk losing a client”.3) A colleague on an equal footingGo to lunch with them and say: “We sometimes interact welland sometimes don’t. What you did is not beneficial to our relationship. Whatprompted it?” Suffering in silence is not what I am recommending at anylevel. It takes some courage to address bullying.Anti-bullying: nine-point actionplanThe Campaign against WorkplaceBullying provides a comprehensive nine-point guide on the website www.bullybusters.org, This is anadapted, shortened version. It:– Needs to state what bullying is with concrete examples. Thisshould include verbal assaults as well as other misconduct. Anne Coles says:”A good policy needs to give some illustrations of what might amount tobullying – undermining, for example. It needs to be made clear that this is notacceptable.”– Must show what would give rise to an investigation– Will state how the investigation should be carried out. Thisshould be in a way that employees consider fair, probably using an outsideagency– Should allow for the immediate separation of plaintiff anddefendant in a way that does not punish either– Should require documentation of damages to the claimantincluding any impact on health or purse– Must state the time within which a response should be made tothe claimant– Must state what will happen if bullying is found – dependingon the gravity of the offence, from public apology right through to severancepackages– Should be followed up with training so that people are awareof the policy– May need an anti-retaliation clause so that any subsequentbullying is seen as a separate caseFurther reading The International Labour Organisation’s anti-bullying report www.ilo.org/public/english/protection/safework/violence/violwk/violwk.pdfAustralian Workplace Bullying Taskforce report, March 2002 http://www.whs.qld.gov.au/taskforces/bullying/bullyingreport.pdfUK-based anti-bullying website www.successunlimited.co.ukUS-based anti-bullying website www.bullybusters.orgBullying and Harassment in the Workplace by the London Chamber of Commerce www.londonchamber.co.uk – lookfor link to report May 2000 Cultural awareness consultancy run by Zareen Karani Araoz www.managingcultures.comThe EU’s next four-year plan for health and safety at work http://europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/news/2002/apr/081_en.htmlThe Irish Health and Safety Authority’s code of practice on the preventionof bullying in the workplace www.hsa.ie/pub/publications/bullyingcop.pdfSouth African anti-bullying website www.worktrauma.org/last_img read more

“READERS FORUM” OCTOBER 29, 2016

first_imgWHATS ON YOUR MIND TODAY?Todays “READERS POLL” question is: If the election was held today for Governor of Indiana who you vote for?Please take time and read our newest feature articles entitled “IU WOMEN’S-MENS SWIM AND DIVING TEAMS.Also take time to read BIRTHDAYS, HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS” posted in our sections.If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected] County Observer has been serving our community for 15 years.Copyright 2015 City County Observer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistribute.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

College announces 2018 Commencement Speaker

first_imgEditor’s note: A version of this story appeared in the print edition of The Observer on March 29.Carolyn Woo, the former chief executive officer of Catholic Relief Services, will address the Saint Mary’s class of 2018 at its Commencement ceremony on May 19, according to a College press release.Woo will be awarded the College’s highest honor, an Honorary Doctor of Humanities, at the ceremony, according to the release.Woo immigrated to the United States for her studies after being born and raised in Hong Kong. She returned to her alma mater, Purdue University, as an associate professor in 1981 and as a full-time professor in 1991. According to the release, she served in several leadership roles at Purdue, as both the director of professional master’s programs in the Krannert School of Management and associate executive vice president for academic affairs.In 1997, Woo took on the role of Martin J. Gillen Dean of the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, which she held until 2011. In 2012, she began her time as the chief executive officer of Catholic Relief Services, where she served until 2016, according to the release.“Carolyn Woo embodies the spirit we strive to instill in our students: She is a woman of action,” College President Jan Cervelli said in the release. “Her career is a testament to the power of leadership that serves the greater good.”The College will also award an additional honorary degree to Sister Margaret “Peggy” O’Neill, according to the release.O’Neill has spent her life advocating for peace, according to the release. In her time working in the Diocese of San Salvador, she has promoted peace through her work with Salvadoran refugees during the civil war and creating an educational and cultural center in El Salvador that emphasized the importance of art and spiritual reflection.According to the release, she currently serves as a faculty member of Santa Clara University’s Casa de la Solidaridad in El Salvador. O’Neill had also spent over 25 years working as a theology professor in the past.O’Neill has received several honors for her work, including the 2008 Peacemaker Award of the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace and the 2008 Ciudadana Ilustre Award, according to the press release.“Sister Peggy O’Neill enriches the lives of those around her with her buoyant spirit and unflagging commitment to service,” Cervelli said in the release. “Her accompaniment of people in need serves as a shining light through darkness.”Tags: Carolyn Woo, catholic relief services, Commencement 2018, Honorary degrees, Margaret O’Neill, Saint Mary’s Commencement,Carolyn Woo, the former chief executive officer of Catholic Relief Services, will address the Saint Mary’s class of 2018 at its Commencement ceremony on May 19, according to a College press release.Woo will be awarded the College’s highest honor, an Honorary Doctor of Humanities, at the ceremony, according to the release.Woo immigrated to the United States for her studies after being born and raised in Hong Kong. She returned to her alma mater, Purdue University, as an associate professor in 1981 and as a full-time professor in 1991. According to the release, she served in several leadership roles at Purdue, as both the director of professional master’s programs in the Krannert School of Management and associate executive vice president for academic affairs.In 1997, Woo took on the role of Martin J. Gillen Dean of the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, which she held until 2011. In 2012, she began her time as the chief executive officer of Catholic Relief Services, where she served until 2016, according to the release.“Carolyn Woo embodies the spirit we strive to instill in our students: She is a woman of action,” College President Jan Cervelli said in the release. “Her career is a testament to the power of leadership that serves the greater good.”The College will also award an additional honorary degree to Sister Margaret “Peggy” O’Neill, according to the release.O’Neill has spent her life advocating for peace, according to the release. In her time working in the Diocese of San Salvador, she has promoted peace through her work with Salvadoran refugees during the civil war and creating an educational and cultural center in El Salvador that emphasized the importance of art and spiritual reflection.According to the release, she currently serves as a faculty member of Santa Clara University’s Casa de la Solidaridad in El Salvador. O’Neill had also spent over 25 years working as a theology professor in the past.O’Neill has received several honors for her work, including the 2008 Peacemaker Award of the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace and the 2008 Ciudadana Ilustre Award, according to the press release.“Sister Peggy O’Neill enriches the lives of those around her with her buoyant spirit and unflagging commitment to service,” Cervelli said in the release. “Her accompaniment of people in need serves as a shining light through darkness.”last_img read more

Sorin residents continue ‘Monk Hoops’ tradition

first_imgWhen former University President and current priest-in-residence of Sorin College Fr. Edward “Monk” Malloy started playing basketball with seminarians, he did not know that “Monk Hoops,” as the tradition is now known, would bring Sorin residents together today.Malloy’s basketball career started in high school, when he played for the top school in the country at the time. He played on Notre Dame’s varsity team as an undergraduate, and did not stop with the sport when he graduated.“Before I moved into dorms, I was on the staff at Moreau Seminary. I used to invite teams from campus to come over and play there against the seminarians,” he said. “We were pretty good, and they were always surprised.”The tradition he started with the seminarians came with him to Sorin College when he moved into the dorm in 1980, Malloy said.“When I eventually moved into Sorin, I thought I would reverse the tradition,” Malloy said. “So that was all we did. We’d gather in the front entrance of Sorin, walk over there together, play basketball, and walk back. There was no food or drink or anything supplied, just people who wanted to play basketball together.”The simple tradition continues even now. Every Monday night, Sorin residents gather on the first floor and walk to Moreau Seminary to play basketball. Even though Monk Malloy no longer regularly attends, the tradition he started hasn’t changed much.Sophomore Ben Walter, who has been a regular attendee of Monk Hoops since his freshman year, said the only difference now is that they sometimes bring a speaker.“I would say especially at the beginning of the year, it’s just an event people can go to get to know the other guys and have fun. It’s a good, structured event you don’t have to plan yourselves, but you can just show up to. Everybody is there to have a good time with all the other Sorin guys,” Walter said. “At the beginning of the year, everybody goes to get to know people. It’s a lot more fun just kind of messing around. Towards the end of the year, it gets more serious. It’s still a lot of fun, though.”Even though the group who regularly attends is generally the same week-to-week, the skill level varies and the competitive nature of the games is relatively low, Walter said.“We just play based on the number of guys we have out there, and we’ll only just play to like 15 points or something,” Walter said. “They’re quick enough games to where we can switch it up so everybody has a good opportunity to play.”Junior Matt Wilks transferred into Sorin last year, and partially credits Monk Hoops for the sense of community he feels within the dorm, he said.“It was definitely — at least from the transfer perspective — one of the first times I was able to meet different guys, just playing basketball. That’s a really good way to meet a lot of people,” Wilks said.In addition to making friends, Wilks said his participation in Monk Hoops enabled him to become even more involved in the dorm when he was recruited by some of his hallmates to join Sorin’s intramural basketball team.Even though many of the players also participate in more competitive environments, such as intramural and Bookstore Basketball, Monk Hoops remains comparatively stress-free, Wilks said.“It’s pretty casual, but people do keep score, so there’s still some competitive element to it, and if it’s a close game, people will get involved. But, overall, it’s generally pretty laid-back, which is nice,” he said. “We all study so much that it’s easy to get bogged down in things, but basketball’s a nice little stress reliever. Playing basketball’s just a different environment to see people in, which is nice.”When asked about Monk, Wilks said he continues to be the force behind the tradition.“Nobody calls it anything but Monk Hoops. It’s not like, ‘Hey, we’re going to play basketball.’ It’s like, ‘Hey, we’re going to Monk Hoops,’” Wilks said. “He’s definitely at the forefront of it.”Walter said he agrees that Malloy’s lasting legacy is at the forefront of the tradition.“We’re doing it in his name. He started a tradition that brings Sorin guys together once a week, so we’re grateful to him for that,” Walter said.The sentiment reflected by Sorin residents now is similar to that of Sorin residents who were involved at the beginning.“It just became a loved tradition. I liked it because it gave me a better chance to get to know the students, and especially if they have any athletic talent, you get a sense of their personalities and everything like that,” Malloy said. “I think most people who did it look back fondly on the friends they made and the competition they enjoyed.”In addition to reflecting on the legacy of Monk Hoops, Malloy joked about the similarity between his presidency and the basketball tradition.“It’s just like Notre Dame — [it] goes on and I’m not in charge anymore,” Malloy said. “Same thing with Monk Hoops.”Tags: Fr. Edward Malloy, Monk Hoops, Sorin Halllast_img read more

UHPA presented the travel.hr website. Offer of all travel agencies for the first time in one place

first_imgAt the presentation, the blogger and the world traveler shared their experience Ivan Bengeri who shared with the audience his experiences from numerous trips. “I decided to make my boyhood dream come true and travel the world. Each country is special in its own way, you just need to travel with your eyes open, without prejudices and you will hardly come across one that will not delight you. It was this view and the desire to offer my followers that prompted me to start my own agencySaid Bengeri. There will be no direct sales (on-click) on the site, but only the promotion of tourist engagements, and additional information about each program can be obtained directly from the travel agency, to which the links will lead. A smart and logical move, but also a big step forward for UHPA However, this is not an informative UHPA website as has been the case so far, in the b2b segment and communication with members, but the new UHPA portal will bring together the offers of all travel agencies and other partners for the first time in one place and present them market.  According to official statistics, there has been a steady increase in the number of passengers traveling through travel agencies. These are indicators that confirm the importance of travel agencies despite the myriad opportunities that allow today’s travelers a direct online connection to destinations. “Domestic travelers trust travel agencies, and the benefits of traveling with travel agencies are truly numerous. Today’s travel agencies are much more than package providers – they create travel experiences, offer an individual approach, recommendations and allow travelers to get to know the destination and sights in the best possible way or simply relax with the assurance that one of the agency’s representatives is always at available. It is for this reason that we believe that all travelers, travel enthusiasts and those who are just about to become happy to use the travel.hr website. ”explained Tomislav Fain. The portal offers new added value for its members, and thus enters the market of tourist offer directly to customers, without commission to any of the various booking portals or platforms.  The new website was created based on the recognized need to create a central place to offer travel abroad, intended for the domestic market – experienced and potential travelers, tourism professionals, adventurers, bloggers, all travel enthusiasts and those who are about to become. In addition to current travel, the site offers tips for travelers, presentation of destinations, attractive articles, travelogues and other interesting things.  As we have already announced, the Association of Croatian Travel Agencies (UHPA) presented a new website in Zagreb today putovanja.hr which combines the offer of travel agencies – members of the association that deals with the organization of travel abroad (ie. outgoing package and / or excursion package).  “The site was created as a logical sequence of work on the promotion of our members, Croatian tourism and tourism in general. Although Croatia is a receptive destination and many agencies are focused on the organized arrival of foreign tourists in our country and Croats like to travel outside Croatia, we, in addition to promoting foreign programs of our agencies, wanted to provide domestic travelers with useful information, travel tips and current offer.” he pointed out Tomislav Fain. last_img read more

Environmental concerns, protests may discourage foreign investment: Moody’s

first_imgThe omnibus bill on job creation, which passed into law on Monday, earlier than previously scheduled on Thursday, has sparked widespread protests and labor strikes nationwide due to concerns that the law will undermine labor rights and weaken environmental protections.Activists and observers have also raised concerns over the law’s deliberations, which they said lacked transparency and public input.“Without offsetting benefits, weaker protections for a large and growing working class could spark opposition from various political and social interest groups, with counterbalancing effects on labor productivity over the near term,” Moody’s said.The government has been struggling to revive the economy, which has been hit hard by uncertainty over the pandemic. Indonesia’s gross domestic product shrank 5.32 percent in the second quarter as household spending and investment contracted 5.51 percent and 8.61 percent respectively. Indonesia’s Job Creation Law may facilitate investment and help revive the economy, but relaxed environmental regulation and widespread protests by labor unions could discourage foreign investors and limit the law’s benefits, Moody’s Investor Service has said.The passage of the omnibus bill is expected to facilitate both domestic and foreign investment and help revive economic growth, Moody’s wrote in a research note on Thursday. Risks, however, loom for the Indonesian economy.“Relaxation of reporting for businesses that have required an environmental impact analysis and easier restrictions on clearing peatland for oil palm plantations could particularly deter foreign investment” that is increasingly focused on environmental-, social- and governance-driven goals and responsible commodity production, Moody’s analysts said. The government projects this year’s full economy to shrink 0.6 to 1.7 percent, marking the first annual economic contraction in two decades.Asian Development Bank (ADB) country director for Indonesia Winfried Wicklein said the omnibus law, along with other policy and regulatory measures, would help the economy to recover from the pandemic and boost its economic outlook.“ADB is looking forward to supporting the government of Indonesia toward achieving more equitable labor market outcomes and addressing concerns on environmental sustainability,” he said in a statement on Thursday.Under the law, environmental permits are now merged with business permits with only high-risk industries required to submit an environmental analysis. The law will also raise fines for environmental damages, with those who burn forests potentially subject to 15 years’ imprisonment and a Rp 7.5 billion fine.The law also returns the authority over land use and permits to the central government from regional administrations and sets up a one-map policy to resolve the issue of overlapping land claims.In addition, it cuts severance benefits paid by employers to laid-off workers from 32 times their monthly salary to 19 times.The JKP scheme will be managed by the Workers Social Security Agency (BPJS Ketenagakerjaan). Article 46E of the bill stipulates that the source of funds for the JKP scheme, which currently has yet to be established under the country’s social security system, will come from the government, workers’ premiums and BPJS Ketenagakerjaan operational funds.Speaking in a press briefing on Thursday, Investment Coordinating Board (BKPM) chief Bahlil Lahadalia said the government would speed up the implementation of the law, adding that the widespread protests did not deter potential investors from coming into the country.“As many as 153 companies from Japan, China and the United States are planning relocation to Indonesia following the passage of the omnibus bill,” he claimed. “They wanted to invest in infrastructure, manufacturing, mining, energy and tourism, among other sectors.”The BKPM chief defended the law, saying “it would be able to create jobs that will benefit workers and will not undermine environmental rules”.Topics :last_img read more

Helen Clark backs letting ex-criminals sell cannabis legally

first_imgNewsHub 7 September 2019Family First Comment: “Helen Clark has no problem with gangs and others growing cannabis illegally getting licences, should it become legal. ‘They’ve got the experience of growing it.’”They have other experience also. Intimidation. Laundering. Deferring funds to illegal activities. Violence….#saynopetodopeHelen Clark has no problem with gangs and others growing cannabis illegally getting licences, should it become legal.“They’ve got the experience of growing it,” the former Prime Minister told Newshub Nation on Saturday.“If you’re moving to a legal market, why would you exclude the people who have traditionally been growing?”Clark’s foundation earlier this week came out in support of legalising the popular drug, and treating it as a health issue rather than a criminal one. Next year Kiwis will be asked for their views in a referendum.“The referendum is not about whether or not people should use it; it’s recognising the reality that it’s there now,” said Clark.“We could put some rules around it or we continue to have it as a complete free-for-all with no rules at all. So that’s why I came down for rules.”She says New Zealand’s well-placed to quickly and painlessly convert the black market thanks to existing rules around tobacco, which she helped write.READ MORE: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zealand/2019/09/helen-clark-backs-letting-ex-criminals-sell-cannabis-legally.htmllast_img read more

December 13, 2017 Police Blotter

first_imgDecember 13, 2017 Police Blotter121317 Batesville Police Blotter121317 Decatur County EMS Report121317 Decatur County Fire Report121317 Decatur County Jail Report121317 Decatur County Law Reportlast_img

RIO2016: Siasia Reads Riot Acts to Dream Team VI Invitees

first_img*Report to camp Monday or forget trip to BrazilDream Team VI Head Coach, Samson Siasia, has warned that any of the players invited from the domestic leagues who fail to report to camp by Monday, April 25 should not bother coming to camp, as the technical crew will work with only players available to them and are willing to play at the Olympics.Speaking after the team’s training session at the practice pitch of the Abuja National Stadium, yesterday, Siasia said he does not want to make the mistake of the past when players who had been penciled down by the coaching crew were not available when needed.“I want to work with only the players on ground, and to get them to the shape I want,” Siasia reiterated.On the issue of other teams in Nigeria’s Group B already announcing plans to include very experienced over-aged players, the U-23 gaffer said the technical crew and the players are not scared of any individual player, but would rather bother about the quality of opposition at the Olympics’ football event. “Yes, I have read of plans by Sweden to include someone like Zlatan Ibramovich as one of their over –aged players for the Games. Good for them, but as far as we are concerned, there is nothing like fear. For us, we are trying to put up a team, and that will determine which players we are going to bring. We have played against players of stronger calibre than Zlatan. We have played against Lionel Messi and Di Maria and others.“We would rather think of the fact that they have a strong team tha‎t will play against us, and not individual players. I don’t want to jump around and start mentioning names, and later if those players are not available, we would be disappointed. So, I have to be sure of what I am doing and when that time comes we will release the names.”On the issue of players like John Mikel Obi and Ogenyi Onazi showing interest in playing for Nigeria at the Olympics, Siasia remarked: “I guess that because Mikel missed out the last time, he wants to make up for it. Not only that, the last couple of games he has played for the Super Eagles, he has been playing very well, and if he wants to be part of the team, of course he is welcome, but as I said we have to look at the positions we really, really need people. We are not going to select players because they play for the Super Eagles or because they are still under the age bracket. They have to compete with those players who actually qualified the team for the Olympics.”Coach Siasia confirmed that he has sent a provisional list of 60 players for the Games. According to him, “if your name is not on that list, then no Olympics for you. That’s why we put as many names as we can, we don’t know the Europe -based players whose clubs would release for the Games.”The U-23 coach said he smiled and stood near Brazil coach, Dunga after the draws at the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro: “I told myself this is the man I would be playing against in the Final Match!”Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more